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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Guys!
My first post on this forum an would like to say hello to the community.

I'm 21 years old and I live in Montreal, Quebec. I'm thinking of registering with the watchmaking school in Trois-Rivières and becoming a watchmaker.

I would love to hear your opinions on the industry. Is it easy to find work in Canada as a watchmaker? Do you have steady work? etc...

If anyone went to the watchmaking school in Trois-Rivières and would share their experience there I would also really appreciate it.

Thanks! :001_smile:
 

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Marlet--welcome to the movement (pun intended). there are a lot of people in this forum who own mechanical watches and mechanical watches need periodic cleaning and servicing. i would imagine for every one person who is a member of the forum there are 100 or more who own a mechanical watch who are not a member of a forum. that adds up to a lot of people in need of a skilled person. i would bet a lot of the watchmakers/repairmen out in the world are getting up in years and the world will need a new generation of watchmakers and that is where you come along.

one thing i know for sure--if watchmaking is your passion then follow it.

as to the school--i am 100% ignorant on that subject.
 

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Welcome, I'm still new here but learning and enjoying the site.

I believe a competent skilled watchmaker will be will always be in demand.
The old guys are dying out and the ranks are thinning.

Vintage watches are gonna be around for a long time and the newer stuff will always require qualified service technitions.

A jeweler friend employs a full time watchmaker and I'd venture the pay is close to 1K/week.
He doesn't change batteries except on the high end quartz models,
all the others are done by the sales personel and the owner.
 

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I would say this: Do something because you enjoy it and not because there is X amount of money to be made. Like anything, if you have a needed skill, you never know where it will lead. If you are good at it and love it, you will be a success.

I tried out at the Rolex watchmaking school in Seattle. I wanted to see what is involved. You will have to do the same thing - be tested to see if you have the necessary skills. You may not. First thing is to 'try out' and see how you do, and see if you really have what it takes. It is NOT easy mentally or physically. You need skills, brains, patience, good eyes and a steady hand. Long hours of quiet time and no talking are involved. It is a world inside of a world.

Most people could not even come close to doing it. So, it could be profitable if you can do it.

Go take the tests and see if you can, indeed, be accepted. Take a look around at the people IN the school. Talk to THEM. Imagine yourself doing it. Be realistic.

I hope this helps.
 

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Speaking as a watchmaker I can say, we need the help! It seems nobody wants to do it any more. I'm in US so I don't know anything about the school.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Nice to meet you, MartletMedia. As far as your generation is concerned : there will always be mechanical watches to repair. Don't forget that the watches made today, or even 5 or 10 years from now will be vintage pieces someday.
I truly believe the need for a new generation of watchmakers / repairmen is vastly under-rated. No matter where you go, I wish you the best.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the quick responses and great encouragement, its great to see an active community!

For sure I want to take up watchmaking because its something that interests me and I would love to do it on daily basis, but unfortunately I cant afford to take a 2 year full time class not to have constant work after finishing school. I hope you understand where I'm coming from.

I'm planing to take a trip to Trois-Rivières in April to check out the school, talk to the instructors and students and get to know what its all about. Until then I hope to talk to some watchmakers in the field today to get some insight from them. I highly believe the I have the skills and qualities to become a watchmaker/repairmen but time will tell when I take the tests.
 

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Enzo's right on mate, if it's speaking to you on the inside strongly then go for it

and give it your all, and take the first step in the process!

Watch makers are as needed today, and probably more so than yester year due to the sheer numbers of watches and the growth of the hobby to date.
No worries of salery and how much, if you get through a decent watchmaking school you'll one day be able to right your own figure into the check easy, and many start at AD's with very nice wadges & compensation.

For the few lucky ones (who really love the profession) of watchmaking, money isn't of a primary concern to them in reality, but always seems to come around and take care of that watchmaker very well.

Good luck & it's great to have you here with us at WTF- :thumbup1:

Jim



I would say this: Do something because you enjoy it and not because there is X amount of money to be made. Like anything, if you have a needed skill, you never know where it will lead. If you are good at it and love it, you will be a success.

I tried out at the Rolex watchmaking school in Seattle. I wanted to see what is involved. You will have to do the same thing - be tested to see if you have the necessary skills. You may not. First thing is to 'try out' and see how you do, and see if you really have what it takes. It is NOT easy mentally or physically. You need skills, brains, patience, good eyes and a steady hand. Long hours of quiet time and no talking are involved. It is a world inside of a world.

Most people could not even come close to doing it. So, it could be profitable if you can do it.

Go take the tests and see if you can, indeed, be accepted. Take a look around at the people IN the school. Talk to THEM. Imagine yourself doing it. Be realistic.

I hope this helps.
 

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I agree with Enzo and Jim

If this is your passion follow it and you'll be suprised where it takes you!
 

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You are young!! i think you have the ability to maybe take the TZ course online and continue with your studies or other potential career passions and see if this is one that you wish to make a livelihood for your future. there are many ways to integrate your hobby into your life. Make sure you want to make a career of it. Start where most have and learn the mechanics. If the operation of the watch intrigues you and you become proficient at it, who knows!! Maybe you will be the next great watchmaker!!

Have fun with it..
 
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