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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As I was going through my late cousin Michael's effects to sell them at an estate sale, I came across a vintage Longine's watch that probably belonged to his father, cousin Big Mike. After doing some research, I am pretty sure that this was a watch they put out for the 1964 World's Fair in New York, especially since there was a woman's watch that went with it. It was love at first sight. At first, after conducting one of those infamous Google searches, I confused it with a similar watch that was worth $3,500. I was sad because there was no way I could justify buying a watch in that price category. However, the jeweler gave me good news when he offered $100 for it. So, I bought it from the estate and gave it to the jeweler to be serviced: new crystal, cleaning, new wrist band. So, a few weeks and $145 later I had a beautiful vintage watch that holds a lot of sentimental value because it belonged to my deceased cousin. I had worn the watch for a couple of months before giving it to the jeweler. It had run maybe two or three minutes fast every two days or so. (Maybe a little more, but certainly an acceptable amount.) After being serviced it runs more than a minute fast EVERY HOUR! (I reset it again at 3:15 pm yesterday. By 7:53 this morning, it read 8:20!) When I called the jeweler, I heard pretty much what I had expected (in a thick Lithuanian accent): "The watch is 70 (sic) years old. The parts are worn. It was filthy when I took it apart. The oil had hardened in places. I cleaned it and adjusted it. I did my best." Should I have followed the watch version of my father's reasoning of why he would not have the engine on his old jalopy cleaned? He said that it was all the gunk that held it together.
 

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I'm echoing Mike on this one. You need a better watchmaker.
I have one watch about to celebrate its 98th birthday, and "a few" from the 30s and 40s, and they all run within +/- 30 seconds per day. There's absolutely no reason why a mid-60s Longines can't run with at least the same accuracy. My layman's guess is (a) the watchmaker was too busy or too lazy to a decent adjustment, or (b) the watch has one or more parts that need to be thrown away and replaced (which the guy should have noticed when he serviced the watch!)

If you're so inclined, I'm sure we'd all love to see some pics of your watch. Although watches used in the fair have been mentioned here before, I don't think we've seen anything specifically produced for connection with the '64 N.Y.S.F.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Now that I've lost faith in my watchmaker, I am wondering if this is a genuine Longines watch as he assured me. Although I have looked for it on many sites, I have never seen a Longines watch with that dial. My cousin also had a beautiful Omega of the same vintage that turned out to be a fake.
 

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Here is my two cents.

First, I am not sure if the dial looked like this before you gave it to the "watchmaker" but now it's ruined. It seems that somebody tried to clean it with sandpaper.

Either way, I had a pocket watch from Longines which was almost 100 years old. It was gaining roughly 15 secs a day - A DAY!!! So, in a week it was max 2 minutes off.

I had another wrist watch also from Longines which was almost 60 years old. This one gained max 10 secs a day.

Bottom line: just because a watch is old does not mean that it's unable to keep time. Find a real watchmaker.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It was just that the photo didn't capture the dial properly. It is a beautiful iridescent mother-of-pearl look. He supposedly sent the dial to California because I wanted the black spots removed. They said it couldn't be done because of the nature of the paint on the dial.
 

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Thank you all for your good advice. I found another watchmaker (Louis-Neil ) who took it apart in front of me and found the problem. A hair (the other watchmaker's?) had fouled the balance wheel. He extracted it and the watch runs like new.
Yep, as i suspected.... :thumbup1: And my advice regarding your Lithuanian friend still stands.
 
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