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I don't believe the Beta 21 movements are "sensitive" to higher voltages unlike the Accutrons. The reason being that the timing comes from a quartz module, the tuning fork only being used to drive the hands (like on a 2242 accuquartz), what a stepper now does for quartz watches.

Having said that I once had a 1301 that was also running too fast too and after a lot of tweaking in vain by a local watchmaker (one of the rare one who looks at these early electronic watches) and then by me, trying to adjust the tension screw on the tuning fork, I sent it to a guy in Poland who had experience with these watches, he managed to slow it down somehow and then...the quartz gave up the ghost. These are 45 year old watches now and you have to accept that the electronics will develop faults out of the blue. It's possible the battery change caused that by adding a bit more "juice" all of a sudden in the circuit.

Having said that I'd send it to Ludmil to see if he can set it straight.
 

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lol Magnet! I also have a Tissot of the same basic design that loses time as well. It's losing 5 mins a day! The other problem is the Tissot and Omegas aren't exactly the easiest watches to set the time on. I find I have to give them a cleaning every 2 years for them to keep decent time.
 

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I found out the 343 battery are no longer manufactured :sad: so I tried a 344 (Accutron 218 battery) that has the same dimension. It worked and keeps time. :thumbup1: Movement number on my Electroquartz. 3173xxxx - Production year (1969)
 

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I don't believe the Beta 21 movements are "sensitive" to higher voltages unlike the Accutrons. The reason being that the timing comes from a quartz module, the tuning fork only being used to drive the hands (like on a 2242 accuquartz), what a stepper now does for quartz watches.

Having said that I once had a 1301 that was also running too fast too and after a lot of tweaking in vain by a local watchmaker (one of the rare one who looks at these early electronic watches) and then by me, trying to adjust the tension screw on the tuning fork, I sent it to a guy in Poland who had experience with these watches, he managed to slow it down somehow and then...the quartz gave up the ghost. These are 45 year old watches now and you have to accept that the electronics will develop faults out of the blue. It's possible the battery change caused that by adding a bit more "juice" all of a sudden in the circuit.

Having said that I'd send it to Ludmil to see if he can set it straight.
They are subject to fluctuations in accuracy due to the higher voltage. They are generally not as difficult to phase as the 214s and 218s. The increase in rate is not caused by a change in frequency, but by a change in amplitude of the oscillator (due to the higher magnetic "kick" from the coil). Using a variable voltage supply, as you crank the voltage up from 1.35V to 1.85V, you can literally "hear" the increas in amplitude as an increase in audible volume. With greater amplitude, the possibility of triple indexing (or intermittant triple indexing) is higher. Good news is that the Beta 21 has a counter balanced resonator...so positional variation is not as great. Also, for phasing, the finer adjustment of the pawl bridge via its screw (in comparison to the 214/218) improves the liklihood of finding a "sweet spot" for silver oxide (1.55v) cells. (The counter-balance and fine adjustment are also attributes shared with the ESA 9162 variants...making both very nice to phase). Although "quartz controlled", the "natural" frequency of the resonator should be adjusted to match the output of the quartz circuit...the adjustment has the practical effect of reducing current draw. As for 1.35v vs 1.55v and effect on the circuit; there is little to indicate that 1.55v is an issue. With the overhead designed in the circuit, it is unlikely that the component life is affected. Most damage seen in these circuits is due to other causes (eg. direct shorts and subsequent heat)...although capacitors do loose capacitance with age (which is sometimes a cause of failure in the transistorized circuits). Would love to have one of the Beta-21 Bulovas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #74 · (Edited)
Exceptionally rare! What a find. Haven’t seen a complete watch for sale in many years. Two versions - this one and one with round dial. The very few that were produced were usually parted out and the case melted for gold value. Movements, when they appear, have gone from around $100+ to a couple hundred dollars.
 

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Bulova Accuquartz Owner - Pls let me know what I should share for collectors

I just plugged it in to google. A lot of factors on scrap prices. I messaged the seller and I hope they make a post here.
Hi USCJake and thanks for reaching out, this is actually my grandfather's watch not my father's - would definitely be great to see this end up in a collector's hands rather melted for the gold value.

Can anyone let me know if there is anything else I should include with the listing to get information to a collector that they would need to assess value here? Can't seem to find a way to embed video to demonstrate that it is fully functional, but but seems to be running great after a 20 year break.
 

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I would do a search on the forum for beta 21. This thread along with others have a great source of information. There are lots of good folks on this board that can help with information about the watch. Since it is such a rare watch it will be tough to compare sold listings. Have a look at 18K Omega beta 21 watch sold listings on ebay that share that case design. I don't know how many Accuquartz beta 21 and omega beta 21 were made, and that would certainly affect valuation.
 
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