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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I received my Sinn 556I a week ago and I'm in love with it, really! I got it on the simple silicone strap from Sinn and I it is a "must have" for the Sinn 556, especially the 556I variant.

It is my first automatic watch and, because of that, I have some questions concerning the movement. From what I know, it houses a Sellita SW200-1 in a top grade variant, which is supposed to be a very accurate, reliable movement. I just have two concerns that make me wonder whether there is something wrong with it:
  1. Is the rotor supposed to be slow when turning? I'm not saying that it doesn't turn, because that isn't the case, but in order for it to turn, I need to turn the watch at least 45°, otherwise it will stay in the same position. My father has a Tag Heuer Carrera (much better watch, not equalling the two, of course) with a Valjoux 7750 (only winds in one direction) and the rotor follows every single movement very cleanly. Should my Sinn movement also turn like this?
  2. The accuracy. This is my main concern. I don't really know many things about how I can measure the accuracy of a watch, but I just placed the second hand in the 12'o clock position (with the help of hacking) and then let it go, when the minute in my phone changed. With that, I could then see if, after some hours, the second hand continued to pass the 12'o clock mark at the same time as my phone changed the minutes. So, after approx. 2 hours, it had a deviation of +2s. Does this mean that in 24h, it will have a deviation of approx. +24s? Because if this is the case, then the movement isn't very well tuned at all.
What do you think? Should I get it serviced? Is this normal within the first weeks, perhaps (the deviation)?

Thank you very much for your attention,
Tex
 

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IMHO one week is too early to start worrying about your accuracy. I'd wait 3-4 weeks, to let your watch "learn the motion habits of your arm". In other words, break-in your watch.

I have a watch rotor that acts like that too, but so far, it doesn't worry me....the mainspring still gets fully wound through normal active arm movement. Like my watch guy told me: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."
Invest in 3 or 4 minutes of effort and repeatedly swirl your watch around so that the rotor turns about 300 revolutions
there's nothing wrong with taking it to a watchmaker for his opinion, and go from there. That insures the movement gets fully wound, Note: merely turning the crown won't do a complete job. And if the watch runs close to 40 hours non-stop, it's working just fine. If you don't have that 40 hours of power, definitely have the watchmaker look at it!

As for accuracy, it's important you start your test with the watch fully broken-in and wound up (see above). As I said before, I usually break my watches in for about a month before I start my time trials.
And +24 seconds per day IS unusually fast. Most mechanical movements average -/+ 4-8 seconds per day, although up to -/+ 15seconds per day is perfectly acceptable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
IMHO one week is too early to start worrying about your accuracy. I'd wait 3-4 weeks, to let your watch "learn the motion habits of your arm". In other words, break-in your watch.

I have a watch rotor that acts like that too, but so far, it doesn't worry me....the mainspring still gets fully wound through normal active arm movement. Like my watch guy told me: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."
Invest in 3 or 4 minutes of effort and repeatedly swirl your watch around so that the rotor turns about 300 revolutions
there's nothing wrong with taking it to a watchmaker for his opinion, and go from there. That insures the movement gets fully wound, Note: merely turning the crown won't do a complete job. And if the watch runs close to 40 hours non-stop, it's working just fine. If you don't have that 40 hours of power, definitely have the watchmaker look at it!

As for accuracy, it's important you start your test with the watch fully broken-in and wound up (see above). As I said before, I usually break my watches in for about a month before I start my time trials.
And +24 seconds per day IS unusually fast. Most mechanical movements average -/+ 4-8 seconds per day, although up to -/+ 15seconds per day is perfectly acceptable.
All right, thank you very much! I did a test yesterday and the results were 7 seconds per day of deviation. Not the best, I'm a little disappointed.
 

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7s/ day is something I can easily live with. If I get that anal about accuracy,
I'll wear a radio-controlled "atomic time" watch
224725
 
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