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It's not a matter of the M51 being fragile, it's just a matter of physical science. The seals in a watch are designed to resist water up to a given pressure. Steady, "static" pressure is very different than the pressure or force from a shower head or car wash. Additionally, the chemical compounds used in the seals may be damaged by chemicals in different soaps. Technically, you're not supposed to swim in chlorinated water with a watch due to the possible damage caused by the chlorine.

I've done all of the above at various times in the past with no ill effects. Since learning about these hazards, I don't do it anymore with any of my watches. A very tiny amount of water inside your watch might not be outwardly visible, but could be very damaging.

In short, you probably won't ever have a problem as a result, but do you really want to take that risk?
 

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I don't know if it's so much that the water is going to get into the watch while you are showering as it is the hot water on the watch for an extended period of time could potentially cause condensation inside the watch. Same with hot tubs.
 

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I have heard the same cautions from many different sources.
I have as well.

Please tell me why anyone would want to shower while wearing their watch. Sorry, but it just doesn't make sense, from a hygiene perspective.

OkeefenokeeJoe
Yeah, there is that. To me, taking a shower with your watch on is a bit like taking a shower with your underwear on... It might get your undies and what's under them clean, but there are easier ways to do so!
 

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As above -- it's about hot water causing temperature/pressure differentials and also differentials in metal/seal/sapphire expansion. My late uncle, a master jeweller and watch smith, told me years ago that "waterproof" never means "hot waterproof", and never to wear any watch, no matter what rating, for extended periods in an hot water environment. Stands to reason when you think about it.
 

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As above -- it's about hot water causing temperature/pressure differentials and also differentials in metal/seal/sapphire expansion. My late uncle, a master jeweller and watch smith, told me years ago that "waterproof" never means "hot waterproof", and never to wear any watch, no matter what rating, for extended periods in an hot water environment. Stands to reason when you think about it.
Exactly, so even though people shower with their watches on the reason Lum-Tec recommends against it isn't because your watch can't handle the depth of your shower, it's because it is a bad idea to pour or dunk your watch in hot water.
 

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For years I wore my Omega in the shower, on river rafting expeditions etc basically gave it hell with no ill effects BUT

I was at Chico Hot Springs, MT (this was years ago) and I thought it's a dive watch can't be an issue to wear in it in a natural hot springs and then get on airplane and fly home. Well that was true except for the condensation that formed inside the watch .....

moral of the story is listen to Chris why take a chance?

Hope I was polite enough :biggrin:

I think it would be OK if its a COLD shower with no soap though!
 

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Please tell me why anyone would want to shower while wearing their watch. Sorry, but it just doesn't make sense, from a hygiene perspective.

OkeefenokeeJoe
lol well you can see my later post but I guess to know what time it is?

while on the subject I also never understood while anyone would bathe in a bathtub either..
 

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bath/baTH/
Noun:

An act or process of immersing and washing one's body in a large container of water.
An ancient Hebrew liquid measure equivalent to about 40 liters or 9 gallons.

Verb:
Wash (someone) while immersing him or her in a container of water: "how to bath a baby".
Synonyms:
noun. bathtub - tub - bathing - bathroom - bathe
verb. bathe - wash - lave - tub
 

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bath/baTH/
Noun:

An act or process of immersing and washing one's body in a large container of water.
An ancient Hebrew liquid measure equivalent to about 40 liters or 9 gallons.

Verb:
Wash (someone) while immersing him or her in a container of water: "how to bath a baby".
Synonyms:
noun. bathtub - tub - bathing - bathroom - bathe
verb. bathe - wash - lave - tub
I think I knew what it was..... just don't know why you want to immerse your body along with all the stuff you are trying to remove from it.... dirt soup
:)
Took 30 years before my wife got it....
 

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Mine lasted 10 years before the seals gave way..

I actually just ordered an M57 this week because my watch of 10 years (Pulsar solar) just succumbed to internal vapor issues. My guess is the additional exposure would act to "shorten" life expectancy and should be acknowledged accordingly. I will indeed "baby" my M57..
 

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Me too...

while on the subject I also never understood while anyone would bathe in a bathtub either..[/QUOTE]

For some reason I never could understand why it doesn't bother some people to wash their face with water that their backside has been stewing in. :confused1:
 

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Its not the "depth" of the shower or the water that gets on the watch during the shower you need to be concerned with. Its a few different things that can cause problems.

A) Soaps - many soaps contain abrasives and chemicals to REMOVE oil from skin. They also may remove the lubricant from the watch seals, may dry the seals or soften them from deterioration. Also soap build up gets pretty nasty looking after awhile!.
B) steam - hot steam can pass a seal much easier than water can if there is any place it could enter. It also can warp or shrink seal thickness leaving an opening for vapor to enter.
C) Temperature differential - If you are in a cold bathroom and go instantly to a hot shower there is a possibility you can create condensation inside the watch although it is completely sealed.
D) Movement/user error- in the process of washing your body there is a chance you could accidentally unscrew the crown enough to allow vapor inside. There is also a chance you may enter before checking to be sure the crown is securely tightened.

So in summery - even if a watch is rated to 15,000 meters of water resistance,it makes no difference at all. Showering with your watch on in our professional opinion IS a bad idea. If you choose to ignore our advice which is the same advice thousands of professional watchmakers will agree with, you can cross your fingers and hope it does not cause any issues with your watch. If it does cause issues, we will refrain from saying "We told you it could cause damage", and kindly send you a repair bill for most likely new seals, new dial, new hands, new movement + stem and labor. Our service department will then kindly thank you for your business.
 

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Its not the "depth" of the shower or the water that gets on the watch during the shower you need to be concerned with. Its a few different things that can cause problems.

A) Soaps - many soaps contain abrasives and chemicals to REMOVE oil from skin. They also may remove the lubricant from the watch seals, may dry the seals or soften them from deterioration. Also soap build up gets pretty nasty looking after awhile!.
B) steam - hot steam can pass a seal much easier than water can if there is any place it could enter. It also can warp or shrink seal thickness leaving an opening for vapor to enter.
C) Temperature differential - If you are in a cold bathroom and go instantly to a hot shower there is a possibility you can create condensation inside the watch although it is completely sealed.
D) Movement/user error- in the process of washing your body there is a chance you could accidentally unscrew the crown enough to allow vapor inside. There is also a chance you may enter before checking to be sure the crown is securely tightened.

So in summery - even if a watch is rated to 15,000 meters of water resistance,it makes no difference at all. Showering with your watch on in our professional opinion IS a bad idea. If you choose to ignore our advice which is the same advice thousands of professional watchmakers will agree with, you can cross your fingers and hope it does not cause any issues with your watch. If it does cause issues, we will refrain from saying "We told you it could cause damage", and kindly send you a repair bill for most likely new seals, new dial, new hands, new movement + stem and labor. Our service department will then kindly thank you for your business.

OK :blushing::blush:
 

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I don't think there is any waterproof watch in the world whose manufacturer doesn't warn against hot tubs and showers. I wore my Luminoxes for years in both and I admit have had a few showers whith some lumtecs. I think I'll stick to the cheaper watches for that from now on.

That said it would be cool if you could design a watch that is shower and hot tub rated. Certainly the demand is there.
 

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I wear all my watches including my M30 (Lum Tec) as well. At the beach and pool.. I was them off and and dry them.

Never had an issue with any of my watches. That also includes diving up to 60 feet.


GQSTEW From N.Y.
Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk.
 
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