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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
At an estate sale this weekend, I picked up a Glycine. The dial says "high speed," yet the movement is automatic. I'd assume that this meant that the watch used the 3,600 vibration frequency for its movement?

The case is all stainless, and the thing is so rare that not even Google has a photo of it. I'd like to learn more about it, but have no idea where to go.

Suggestions?

Thanks - Boomzilla
 

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Would you be kind enough to show us photos of it...including a close-up of the movement if you can? 2 reasons:
1) Knowing what the watch and movt. look like may help us point you in the right direction.
2) I'm just really want to see it. :w00t:
In these days of Rolexes, Omegas, Seikos, and giant Androids, I feel Glycine is starting to become forgotten and un-appreciated.
Thanks
 

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"Glycine High Frequency" is probably about as much of a description as you're going to get. Yours is typical of the late1960s-early 1970s. Back then, many watches were simply called Men's Steel, Gold, Gold-plated, etc. Automatic. And that was that! The movement appears to be a Glycine factory-modified movement made by
ETA...probably the ETA 2824 (the 2824-1 didn't appear until 1979 and the current movement, the 2824-2 didn't appear until 1982).

Ranfft's movement data: bidfun-db Archive: Watch Movements: ETA 2824-1

As for value, with a fresh crystal and those case marks carefully buffed out, it could be between $80 and $100. And again, Dr. Ranfft is my source. These watches sell for slightly less on eBay. This valuation BTW is also based on the fact that because of the crystal, I can't tell the condition of the dial, I don't know when it was last serviced, and I don't know how well it runs. Even small problems do a lot to devalue a watch's intrinsic worth.

BTW the 2824 beats at 28,800 vph
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you kindly! For that low value, it's a keeper. I can either buff the case to gloss or re-texture it to a matte finish. Which do you recommend for aesthetics?

As for the crystal, is it possible to replace the scratched mineral glass crystal with an eBay sapphire one? The watch seems to run and keep time fine, so since it's not broken, I won't fix it. When it stops, I'll just donate it to the local thrift store or watch shop for parts. Since I paid but $25 for it at the estate sale, I got my money's worth!
 

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No problem.
For the case, I'd leave that up to you. Quite frankly: you're going to wear it and not me. The finish should be what YOU are going to be happiest with and the heck with what anyone else thinks!!!
As to the crystal? Sure it's possible; I just wouldn't have any idea if any are available. If and when you find one, give serious thought to having it
professionally cemented onto the case. It can't cost much and will look much better.

A twenty-five buck Glycine...you can't get much luckier than that unless you win the Lotto jackpot!
 

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I'm a sucker for a blue dial, and those blue striped hands look cool as well. I'd throw it on a leather strap, but am in two minds over polish or brushed finish. Would love to see the dial once that crystal is replaced.
Do you know it's a mineral crystal? If it's just acrylic you can polish it yourself easy enough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The dial looks flawless. The crystal IS mineral glass (I just HATE mineral glass crystals). Yes, I'll pay my buds at the local watch shop to size, order, and cement in the new crystal.

Since the band on the watch is WAY too small for me, I'll have to consider what to replace it with. A dark blue leather might match the dial, or a woven stainless braid might look nice. The watch is too formal to use a NATO band.

I'll probably gloss-polish the case first. I'm hoping that the gloss will show off the unusual case shape. If it doesn't work, I can easily texture it in any grain I want. A fine matte finish with the grain aligned vertically with the dial sounds nice.

Thanks to all of youse guys for the excellent information. Yes, a $25 Glycine is a bargain, but over the years, I've picked up an Omega "Man on the Moon" watch for $300, a Rolex Explorer (first generation) for $150, and a solid 14K Cyma (quartz) for $300. I've also picked up various Girard Perregaux, Omega, and Xemex watches for bargain prices. I wish I'd kept more of them, but when my collection exceeds about 20, I get the itch to divest. I've currently got a bunch of nice manual-winds that I probably need to cull...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
My experiences with crystal polishing have been 100% successful with acrylic crystals, and ZERO percent successful with mineral glass or sapphire crystals. Every time I've tried a Dremel to buff a mineral glass crystal, it ends up grooving the glass, and the crystal is then a throw-away. For case polishing, the Dremel works perfectly, and for texturing, a synthetic sanding block is the easiest method I've found. Little elbow grease - consistent texture - fine grain & direction control.

I'll repost photos of the Glycine after its Spring cleaning. I'm going with the gloss case finish and a dark blue strap. Who makes the best "long" straps for reasonable prices? Also, is the current, stainless-steel band on that Glycine an original or a replacement? If the former, it might be worth eBaying for parts; if the latter, it's off to the trash. Thanks again!
 
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