WATCH TALK FORUMS banner
1 - 14 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi,

Attached pictures of my Watch. The watch is running fast, gains minutes in hour. I took off the back and noticed the adjustment for + and - is a very small screw! So not having the correct screwdriver does not help and also I don't want to damage the watch by trying to adjust!

The interior is very clean! Gold filled 17J Swiss movement, no dial discoloring, no moisture damage, excellent condition other than that.

Who do you know can do a proper adjustment?

Any thoughts what the watch value may be, I only ask since I do not want a repair to be more than value.

Thanks for any help, Happy Fathers Day to Dads!

Thanks
Bob
Watch Hand Analog watch Clock Plant
Watch Arm Gesture Finger Watch accessory
Watch Analog watch Clock Watch accessory Silver
Tableware Tin Dishware Serveware Drinkware
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,329 Posts
Jewelry shops that sell and service watches are becoming scarce but if you have one with a watch maker on staff I would think that should be your first stop. As for value, you could check ebay for past sales but putting a value on a watch is not something done on this forum.
BTW, a set of screw drivers with the proper size can probably be found for $10 - $20 if you feel like "tweaking" that adjustment screw. Make very small adjustments if you choose to try by yourself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Jewelry shops that sell and service watches are becoming scarce but if you have one with a watch maker on staff I would think that should be your first stop. As for value, you could check ebay for past sales but putting a value on a watch is not something done on this forum.
BTW, a set of screw drivers with the proper size can probably be found for $10 - $20 if you feel like "tweaking" that adjustment screw. Make very small adjustments if you choose to try by yourself.
Hi Thanks! I found a service dealer in Utah, That works on many brands, free appraisal. Worst case I pay 10.00 for return shipping. Still trying to decide, I like the Blue Dial and Strap so need to decide my next step!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
16,540 Posts
The actual work is relatively very simple...it's just time-consuming (no pun intended) ! Call the serviceman first, explaining what you want, and ask if he'll give you a ballpark estimate of the cost. If indeed a regulation is all you need, I'd be surprised if he charges over $50 to do the job. As we speak, I have a Ball Fireman II in the shop being regulated (+75 seconds / 24 hours). The job is simply too exacting for my own level or proficiency. I'll have a pro do it!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,329 Posts
This picture looks very similar to the movement picture you posted. Can't read many of the numbers on your picture but you might be able to determine if they are a match to some on this picture.
Watch Product Analog watch Red Clock
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The actual work is relatively very simple...it's just time-consuming (no pun intended) ! Call the serviceman first, explaining what you want, and ask if he'll give you a ballpark estimate of the cost. If indeed a regulation is all you need, I'd be surprised if he charges over $50 to do the job. As we speak, I have a Ball Fireman II in the shop being regulated (+75 seconds / 24 hours). The job is simply too exacting for my own level or proficiency. I'll have a pro do it!
Hi Bill, Yes, I put in a service request with timesticking. appreciate your feedback!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The actual work is relatively very simple...it's just time-consuming (no pun intended) ! Call the serviceman first, explaining what you want, and ask if he'll give you a ballpark estimate of the cost. If indeed a regulation is all you need, I'd be surprised if he charges over $50 to do the job. As we speak, I have a Ball Fireman II in the shop being regulated (+75 seconds / 24 hours). The job is simply too exacting for my own level or proficiency. I'll have a pro do it!
High Bill, you are correct on the High Frequency, check out this link. Girard Perregaux Gyromatic "High Frequency" Day-Date very rare-C for $1,773 for sale from a Trusted Seller on Chrono24
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I just found this article on the web: Interesting my watch has the Logo
The Caliber 32A Movement
Chronometry had been regarded as the pinnacle of watchmaking since the 18th century. In 1966 Girard-Perregaux began submitting their newly developed Gyromatic Calibre 32A movements to the Bureaux officiels de contrôle de la marche des montres (B.O). This calibre oscillates at 36 000 vibrations per hour (vph), and was a continuation in the development of the line, as increasing the frequency of the movement’s oscillations was preferable to increasing the size of the balance wheel. The theory was, the faster the balance swing, the less impact on timekeeping variations from positional change and variation in temperature.

662 Pieces
Earlier Gyromatic models had calibres running at 18 000 (all 21 and 22 series) and 21 600 vph (most of the 32 series, excluding the 32.7 and 32A) and the overwhelming majority of Gyromatics already produced did not meet the exacting requirements of chronometer certification. The first, the 21 series was introduced in 1957 and the 32 series in 1962. In 1966, the in house research and development team (a rarity among watch manufacturers then) was ready. The Gyromatic Chronometer HF with its fantastic quality high beat movement, featuring hack seconds, micro metric fine regulator screw, ISOVAL self-compensating hairspring and monometallic balance was made in a serial production run of 662.
The chronometer test for each of the 662 cased movements was conducted by the B.O. for 15 consecutive days in six positions and three temperatures. Every Chronometer HF proved precise enough to have received the additional distinction of “especially good results” printed on the issued certificate called a “bulletin de marche”.

However, 40 of these watches were in addition submitted to the Neuchatel Observatory for a secondary, longer test period of 45 days. These models are identifiable by the “Observatory Chronometer” signature on their dials as opposed to the “Chronometer HF” as seen here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I just found this article on the web: Interesting my watch has the Logo
The Caliber 32A Movement
Chronometry had been regarded as the pinnacle of watchmaking since the 18th century. In 1966 Girard-Perregaux began submitting their newly developed Gyromatic Calibre 32A movements to the Bureaux officiels de contrôle de la marche des montres (B.O). This calibre oscillates at 36 000 vibrations per hour (vph), and was a continuation in the development of the line, as increasing the frequency of the movement’s oscillations was preferable to increasing the size of the balance wheel. The theory was, the faster the balance swing, the less impact on timekeeping variations from positional change and variation in temperature.

662 Pieces
Earlier Gyromatic models had calibres running at 18 000 (all 21 and 22 series) and 21 600 vph (most of the 32 series, excluding the 32.7 and 32A) and the overwhelming majority of Gyromatics already produced did not meet the exacting requirements of chronometer certification. The first, the 21 series was introduced in 1957 and the 32 series in 1962. In 1966, the in house research and development team (a rarity among watch manufacturers then) was ready. The Gyromatic Chronometer HF with its fantastic quality high beat movement, featuring hack seconds, micro metric fine regulator screw, ISOVAL self-compensating hairspring and monometallic balance was made in a serial production run of 662.
The chronometer test for each of the 662 cased movements was conducted by the B.O. for 15 consecutive days in six positions and three temperatures. Every Chronometer HF proved precise enough to have received the additional distinction of “especially good results” printed on the issued certificate called a “bulletin de marche”.

However, 40 of these watches were in addition submitted to the Neuchatel Observatory for a secondary, longer test period of 45 days. These models are identifiable by the “Observatory Chronometer” signature on their dials as opposed to the “Chronometer HF” as seen here.
The rest of article and special instructions on lube and what not to lube!

Special Instructions
The escape wheel teeth and complete pallet must never be cleaned or lubricated. Some parts have been permanently dry lubricated due to the high speed of the movement. Regular oil would simply fly off the parts due to inertia. These watches needed special lubrication and greasing. However, this allowed owners peace of mind after purchase. These watches were sold with one year warranties and guarantees of accuracy within 1 minute per month or free adjustment within a year of purchase.
The Guarantee also notes that it is possible to synchronize a Chronometer HF if the mainspring is not at full tension by holding the sweep seconds hand still at 12 with the crown and releasing it when ready as a form of hacking seconds. The movement also features a quickset date, which is quite a nice feature. By turning the hands to about 8:40 and advancing to 12:00 repeatedly, quickset adjustments can be made.

My watch is in good original condition. Only the strap and buckle has been changed since new. It was on a Speidel Twist-O-Flex bracelet when I purchased it and I replaced it with an 18mm black calfskin strap. I am currently testing the accuracy against an atomic clock application on my Android phone and so far it has only lost a second per day. Not bad at all.
 
1 - 14 of 13 Posts
Top