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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I just purchased this watch a couple of days ago. Its my first automatic watch and so far it hasnt stayed going for more than 2 or 3 hours at a time. It'll stop in the middle of the day when im wearing it sometimes and it stops in the middle of night. The manual says to wind it 6 or 7 times prior to initial use. What do they mean by winding it and how do I do it? Im assuming, since this is my first automatic watch, that im doing something wrong and the watch itself is fine.

Thanks for the help.
 

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Hi,

I just purchased this watch a couple of days ago. Its my first automatic watch and so far it hasnt stayed going for more than 2 or 3 hours at a time. It'll stop in the middle of the day when im wearing it sometimes and it stops in the middle of night. The manual says to wind it 6 or 7 times prior to initial use. What do they mean by winding it and how do I do it? Im assuming, since this is my first automatic watch, that im doing something wrong and the watch itself is fine.

Thanks for the help.
To pre-wind an automatic watch you turn the crown clock-wise. Personally, I would wind it more than 6-7 times. For my watches, I usually do 15-20 winds. By winds, I mean turning the crown about 360 degrees (one full turn) 15-20 times. Your watch may need servicing if it does not continue running overnight after pre-winding and wearing it all day.
 

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Now that's something I did not know about automatic movements... :thumbup:

I have a silent, one rotor, single slot winder that keeps my Seiko 5, day/date watch fully wound and it stays within a few seconds a day with my best Accuquartz.

Not to hijack this thread but hey, it's the first of a new year; time for an inventory of the collections, no?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks oliverb,

from what I understand from reading articles online, winding the watch compresses a spring in the watch which provides it with the needed energy. Until now, I had been rotating the crown counter clockwise. Maybe that was uncompressing that spring, explaining why my watch wasnt lasting very long?
 

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Thanks oliverb,

from what I understand from reading articles online, winding the watch compresses a spring in the watch which provides it with the needed energy. Until now, I had been rotating the crown counter clockwise. Maybe that was uncompressing that spring, explaining why my watch wasnt lasting very long?
No, you can't unwind a watch but turning the crown counter-clockwise just doesn't wind it. Some folks use a back-n-forth clockwise/counter-clockwise winding motion never removing their thumb and index finger from the crown. Yes, just like the mechanical watch - manual wind or automatic wind - you are in effect storing energy in the mainspring by winding the watch. That energy is slowly released as the spring unwinds thus providing the power to run the escapement (tic toc) movement.

All this was common knowledge many years ago but has since passed from our daily lives with the advent of the various types of battery powered movements - from electric driven escapements w/o a mainspring to tuning fork movements to quartz movements of the LCD, LED and Analog types. Interest in mechanical watches seems to have picked up in recent years - especially with the cheaper jeweled automatic watches from China. There is even a resurgence of LED watches of all types including the interesting Binary ones.
 
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