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Discussion Starter #1
:):)

while trying out my new 50mmf/1.8 Nikkor lens, I'm getting a HUGE amount of purple fringing in the well lit areas.. whats up? any ideas?

diver88:):)
 

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Hummm... I thought someone posted a question on that & I saw an answer. But I can't remember nor can I find it. So can't help... :sad:

I'm assuming of course this guy's not your photo assistant and in the room when you're taking the pictures.



If he is, that could be part of the porblem.... :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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Purple fringing is usually a problem for compact cameras with tiny sensors, not digital SLR's with interchangeable lenses. I think Scott may be on to something if you 're talking about indoor photography; what's in the room that could reflect onto shiny surfaces? I think we need to know more and see some examples before trying to figure out what's going on...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
:)

doing something wrong and I don't know what. this is the best:confused1:
picture I got using the 50mm f/1.8. also, my camera would not operate unless the lens was set and locked on f/22 ??



this is what I called purple fringing, the watch was in a light tent and nothing purple anything near it.. AAARRRRG:blink:

any ideas?

No Scott, Barney was not helping me ..

Diver88:):)
 

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What model Nikon camera are you using? The lens may not be fully compatible if it is an older model and the camera a new one. The lens aperture appears to be fully open rather than closed down in this picture, which may account for the appearance of purple fringing; but I am by no means sure. Have you tried switching to manual operation? I am no Nikon expert (Canon and Contax are my areas of "expertise"). Are there any veteran Nikon users out there in Watch Talk Forums land to help diver88 with this problem?
 

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One other thought: Is there anything on the front of the lens, such as a close-up diopter attachment? The single-element ones can cause some quality issues, which is why I prefer to use an extension tube for closeups with non-macro lenses...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
:)

thanks Mr Barry,

the camera is a d40 Nikon 6.1 mp.
I bought the lens at a local camera store, and none of the
auto features work between the two.. if I had the d80 or d200
the lens would be fully auto functional, I believe.

this situation has only happened using the 50mm f/1.8 Nikkor lens, not with the "kit" lens 18-55mm. you might be on something, I don't remember if I had the Nikon Close -up NO.2 (3.0 Diopter) lens attachment installed or not. I did have it on for a few shots but removed it and things didn't seem to get better. I'll try agin today making sure not to have it on (3.0 Diopter).

but since I am new to this I don't understand how I can get any picture with anything with a wider aperature than f/22 if that is where the camera requires it to be locked to operate? the f/1.8 fast lens is why I bought it to begin...

thanks for your help..

diver88:):)
 

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The Nikon close-ups have a good repute. I think the ones I have are in fact two-element Nikons, but I have no idea which box of seldom-used goodies they are in. Anyhow, I think the problem is the incompatibility of the old lens with the modern camera. I'd go back to the store and see if someone there can suggest a solution. In the interim, I'd use the 18-55 kit lens in preference. These kit lenses are usually better than their reputation.
 

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What you're seeing is known as "chromatic abberation". It's most prevelant in areas of black and white; or, as seen in your photo, an area where there's a lot of reflection.

In my experience, this is almost always caused by the lens. The quality of the optics has the single biggest influence on this.

Another thing I notice is that your white balance appears to be off quite a bit. What type of lighting are you using? You might want to compensate for that, as that could have some impact, as well...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
:)

the lighting was three 100w daylight temp 6500K bulbs (florescent) outside of a light tent, at night. the lens being set at f/22 is what I don't get, the camera would not operate unless this was done.. I'm calling the store where I got it and see if the gaps can be filled in a bit..

diver88:):)
 

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Diver, there is an excellent Nikon users website called Nikonians, which has a forum specifically for Nikon D40 and D50 cameras; there is a thread on all known fully-compatible lenses for the series, and a 50mm f 1.8 is not among them. I suspect a combination of factors is at work here and the result is that you are getting purple fringing or chromatic aberration as Steve says, possibly by a combination of the incompatible lens' aperture staying at f1.8 rather than stopping down sufficiently to give any depth of field plus the use of the close-up diopter attachment. The lens also could be faulty, with one or more elements knocked out of alignment. You might post a query on that website to see if anyone has experience with your particular camera/lens combination. Sorry you're having such difficulty.
 

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Hey Diver,

Do you have it in manual mode? Did you match the camera aperature to the lens? I remember having some issues at first with mine too. I'll get the camera out tomorrow & see if I can remember what I did and post it.....
 

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What you're seeing is known as "chromatic abberation". It's most prevelant in areas of black and white; or, as seen in your photo, an area where there's a lot of reflection.

In my experience, this is almost always caused by the lens. The quality of the optics has the single biggest influence on this.

Another thing I notice is that your white balance appears to be off quite a bit. What type of lighting are you using? You might want to compensate for that, as that could have some impact, as well...
Hmmmm...I don't think the white balance is off by that much....I'm seeing the photo is heavy on cyan in some of the white areas, which is not at all uncomon when shooting with daylight temperature florescent light sources...and it's easily correctible with post photo editing software.

What amazes me more is that Terry indicates (if I'm reading correctly) that his photo was taken at an f-stop of 22! That's a pretty narrow depth of field I'm seing! :scared::blink:
 

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Here's what I was able to correct in about 30 seconds with Photoshop:

Here's Terry's "before" photo:



Here's the "after" photo where I selectively removed some of the cyans and magentas which were problematic:

 

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hey John, I was thinking the same thing on the F-stop. The DOF seems awfully shallow for that high a F-stop.

Terry,
How close was the camera to the watch? And did you confirm if you have a lens adapter on it? Those will definitely limit the DOF as they usually curve at the outer edge of the adapter. Try it without the close up adapters & also try moving the camera further away & using the crop to get closer. It makes focusing a bit harder, but I saw better results in mine when keeping the camera about 20-24" away.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
:):) Mr Barry,

I called and they told me things did not sound just right, to come in and they would help... well, as you probabaly know it rained cats, dogs and goats yesterday so I did not venture from the shed. so no help there as of yet.


Mr Scott and Mr John....

I am really new to this so....
on the new lens there is a moveable f/stop ring as manual.
my camera says on the display no matter what mode or anything that the f/ring must be set and locked at f/22 before anything will operate..

doesent that decrease the size of the aperature mechanically on the lens?
so no matter what I do with the camera from then on the aperature is no wider open (lower number) than the physical opening on the lens?

the photo I posted showed this info,
f/5.6
shutter speed 1 second
1.'6"
manual focus
camera setting on Priority
ISO @200

I do think the 2 element Nikkor close-up 3 diopter was on the lens at the time
(I'm guessing)

I will play with the lens again today to see what happens..

thanks guy's you are teaching me... I'm learning

diver88:):)
 

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Wow Terry...the short answer is, I agree the lens your using probobly isn't the best choice for your camera.

The longer answer is, that sounds like a lens designed for a 35mm film camera....I'm going to show my youthful age here (and relative innexperience with film based cameras) but I've never worked with a lens that featured an "f ring." :blink:

Clearly the metadate indicates the shot was taken at f5.6 which makes sense looking at the DOF on the photo. If by "priority mode" you mean Aperture Priority, then the f stop could have been adjusted in camera.

Really, I should just shut up....I've never really played with a Nikon. :confused1:
 

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Hey Terry,

So the lens should work for you. I do believe it should auto-focus for you too. According to Nikon's web-page it is compatible with the D40. So here's what I did on the D80. This seems to work best for mine at least.

1) set the lens on F22. I believe it must be on F22 for the camera to be able to control the aperture. That's why it won't allow you to take a picture on anything other than F22. it can't control the aperture on the other settings (I assume those are for non-auto cameras).

2) set the camera to "A" mode (Aperture of course.. :001_smile: ) ).

3) Using the front scroll-wheel (in front of the shutter release) set the camera to the F-stop you want. You'll see the setting change on the LCD display. You can scroll from F22 - F1.8. The exposure time will auto adjust (assuming you've locked in the ISO).

Here's 2 sample shots I took using the above steps. On a tripod, exact same camera position, using the exact same lens, no flash - just inside light, and set to ISO400. I loaded them at 1024x768 to give you a better view. Note, I have done zero corrections, both are straight off the memory card. These are the exact same shot. Nothing except Aperture was changed.

Set on F1.8:


Set on F22:



As you can obviously see, the depth of field is far better in the one taken at F22. While the lens was set for F22 on the 1.8 shot, you can see the camera did adjust the lens down to the 1.8 setting. I think if you do that, you'll see the camera is adjusting the F-stop. Give that a shot & see if it helps. For testing purposes, try something similar to what I did, taking a frame down a long board with items on it so you can truly guage how the setting are locking in. Once that's done, then move back to the macro stuff. Now when you do, try moving the camera farther away from the watch. I had a heck of a time getting it to work at minimal distances, so I moved it back & cropped on the PC & it worked far better.

Try that & let me know... :thumbup1:


BTW, exposure times were of course very different. The F1.8 exposure was 1/60 while the F22 exposure was 3 seconds.
 
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