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Hello all!

I'm a young lady in California trying to find out more about my grandfather's watch. He's gone now, but I knew him well, and have a momento. He won this watch in a contest while an employee of the Oakland Tribune in 1940 (there's an inscription). It is a Hamilton watch, mechanic, with a little diamond (probably after market?) to the upper left. The strap is replaced, I'm assuming, and the dial looks quite nearly like the "Endicott" from my preliminary web research. The difference is that in all the photos I find of the Endicott, the "Hamilton" print on the dial is located much higher (and closer) to a placement between the 11 and the 1 than on my grandfather's watch. I wonder if that is an indicator that it is an earlier production?

In any event, here is where you will find a photo of the Endicott: http://www.antiquevintagewatches.com/graphics/endicott400.jpg

And here is where you will find two photos of my grandpa's watch: Flickr: OT_Carl_Fontan_1940's Photostream

All photos are also attached to this thread.

Thank you very much for your help! I'm hopeful you can help me zero in on its history!

Genevieve
 

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Definitely an Endicott. Dials are often redone and the where Hamilton is placed sometimes will vary. There's nothing about your grandfathers that doesn't look correct to me.

Early Endicotts will often have an early movement like a 987F instead of a 987A. And there were some dial variations as well.

You should get your grandfathers watch serviced (cleaned, oiled and adjusted) by a watchmaker and keep it as a memento. Although it's a man's watch, it's small enough that a woman could wear it.

One of the front lugs looks a little damaged. You could probably find a better case on eBay and use the same case back but then is it still Grandpa's watch? The damage does effect the value though.
 

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Ah, I missed the diamond reference - that explains the funny looking lug.

There's another applied gold numeral dial you sometimes see on the earliest Endicotts. It seems to have 4 concentric circles outside the numbers that form the minute track (as shown below) with black rectangles at the hours while the later AGN examples have only 3 with black triangles. The dials above are later examples.

I think the later dial is a two tone butler / white finish and you can see it pretty well in reference photo above. I'm not sure about the earlier dial... might be just all butler.

 
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