WATCH TALK FORUMS banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi there,
This is my second watch thread in what may become a "series" on different types of dollar watch movements in the small collection I have acquired over the last month. My apologies if some of the technical terms are clunky or wrong, the only watch repair book I have thus far is really limited in scope! I'll get a better one soon. Has anyone seen the below type of escape wheel design before? It looks really unique to me. Also, if anyone knows anything on the history of these Columbians I would be really grateful to hear it. I found nothing so far online. Cheers,
Alan
WATCH TYPE: Coinsilver Columbian “Dollar” Pocket Watch with Hunter Case
Movement Serial(s): 4327
Movement Text(s): Columbian, Trademark USA, Patented
Movement Type: higher end dollar watch. Unique escapement design, jewels on at least balance wheel & escapement, multiple removable plates and bridges.
Dial Text: Columbian (in cursive)
Caseback Serial: 4327 / Caseback Text: Coinsilver / Case Type: coinsilver hunters
Crystal: missing (bezel also missing)
Metals: CoinSilver, Dial appears to be copper with a ceramic veneer adhered!
Hands: 2 (type?) / Font: A form of Arabic?
Initial Inspection & Diagnosis> [12.07.10]: Protective (hunter) lid button non-functioning. Must depress crown to wind; does not wind properly. Pried open dust cover. Balance wheel assembly revolves with freedom. Unique escapement wheel. Missing front bezel/crystal. One screw is missing on movement back – it holds the plates together. Removed one holding screw (bottom). Removed movement from case. Noted reason for failure of crown to depress – the interior spring metal (two such spring levers, one also ‘springs’ the front case lid) that rests in a depression in the interior case perimeter recess is corroded. The spring steel is screwed into place, but that screw’s head is broken off (the other is intact) and I will have to deal with this minor issue later. Noticed at this time that dial has hairline cracks and appears to be ceramic. One of the two dial set screws has a cracked head so I used dowel and tweezers to rotate it free. Damage thus far indicates hard use and one or more overly brutish tinkerers at work. There is a hole in the crown housing/bolster/swell that may have been drilled as a misguided repair. Continuing on, I removed the cannon pinion spacer, then cannon pinion (this is from the dial side). Flipped watch around and removed two screws from regulator surface – decorative pieces – which also release the balance wheel assembly. Removed balance wheel assembly—hairspring is blue and quite attractive. Had to let down the mainspring manually by slowly catching the escapement wheel with two alternating screwdriver heads and easing it around and around; it seems to run faster and then slower, faster and then slower. Something is off balance within. I am impressed with how refined this watch design is thus far. Removed two more screws and the correlating cover plate to reveal the mainspring ratchet wheel. At this point I noticed that the plate has a hole drilled above the click to allow letting down of mainspring. That would have been useful to know/use for anyone with this watch, save me– since the crown is not engaging properly I could not have let the mainspring down normally anyway. Removed one last screw and then removed second (of two) layers of this half-moon shaped plate. Main train of watch movement revealed with the removal of last plate. Removed “2nd wheel” and “3rd wheel” from the mainspring. Escapement bridge and wheel left intact for the time being – escapement floats and rotates well so the movement’s stickiness is probably elsewhere else. Will need to remove to escape wheel to oil jewel eventually…. Moving back to crown area, I removed two screws and the cover of whatever version of crown/castle wheel assembly this watch has (directly underneath crown). Then removed mainspring barrel – it is two-sided, perhaps to protect the grease? This enclosed mainspring is a first for me. The different “dollar” watches I have opened prior to this one have had an open face barrel design. Eureka! Upon closer inspection the springloaded castle-type assembly wheel has two teeth broken off, perhaps due to rough winding, etc. I will stop now and research whether I need to have this piece fabricated or whether it is common enough for simple replacement. On closer inspection a fragment of the damaged wheel/sprocket was lodged in the mainspring teeth, resulting in the slowing of the action that I observed earlier while letting down the spring. I hope the parts are easy to repair and find. It is a lovely watch.



















 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,128 Posts
Nice photos ! Do you realize that you are working on a "duplex escapement ". These are very cheap and diffucult to work on . Look at the escape wheel , it has two levels . You may also notice that you don't have a pallet. Starting with is watch is probably not a good idea. PM me and we can get you statred on something better..........Jesse
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Nice photos ! Do you realize that you are working on a "duplex escapement ".
I do now, Jesse! Thanks for the guidence and help. I plan to update/rewrite this page once or twice in the near future (once I understand more about what I have done, and how the watch works). After learning that it was a "duplex escapement" from you I did some web browsing, and found a youtube video that displays the breakdown of a movement that looks identical to mine: modeled on the 1880 Waterbury Duplex Movement. So that appears to be the movement type, and the escapement type.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,435 Posts
Thank you, Jesse! :thumbup1::thumbup1::thumbup1:
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top