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oops just seen the scotchbrite trick is common knowledge, and probably originated here too! Really works good.

Roger
 

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Well Roger


Our patron John Holbrook spoke of this technique some years back before he started WTF. As said in reply to your introductory thread, I've never ventured down Scotch Brite Alley. The thought is akin to a horological nightmare.


Have a nice day now


ZIN
 

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One of the most common posts, along with "which should I choose?" "AD referal please?" "Rolex v Omega?" "can I swim with?"

Don't worry about it, we all gotta start somewhere in this crazy insane world of WISdom.
 

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I have done parts of my clasps and watch case for years this way...

It doesn't do much for dents, however....:scared:
 

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I have done parts of my clasps and watch case for years this way...

It doesn't do much for dents, however....:scared:
Dents require a 5 pound hammer and veeerrry deft application of same! :001_tongue:
 

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I have found the "gas-wrench" (AKA Blow torch) is a more effective and delicate way to completely destroy a watch case.

Don't forget to pop the crystal out- it will shatter quickly!:001_tt2:
 

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As said in reply to your introductory thread, I've never ventured down Scotch Brite Alley. The thought is akin to a horological nightmare.
Yeah, I won't go near one of mine with steel wool... :scared:

Just my $0.02.
 

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We need to start a Watch Preservation Society in the midst of all these Scotchbrite waving masses my friend :D:D:D


Be well now


ZIN
 

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I've heard of the Cape Cod polishing cloth being good but know little more about it. I imagine several members can chime in with their experience on this.

A professional watchmaker will have other tools of course, all of which scare me witless ;) :D:D


Be seeing you my friend


ZIN
 

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:)
the Cape Cod Cloths are good for shiny surfaces, the synthetic steel wool (aka scotchbrite) is good for scuffed satin finishes as our Seamasters have.

when you have a little deeper scratches I have used 220 grit 3M sanding sponges, but not very often. scotchbrite works on light scuffs and scratches the best and is less abrasive.IMHO

diver88:):)
 

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I managed a couple of Pizza Huts some 35 years ago and we used Scotch-Brite to keep our stainless steel oven doors looking good. The doors start out as shiny and the Scotch-Brite renders a brushed finish that doesn't show finger prints as much and of course the Scotch-Brite makes cleaning burned-on food much easier.

I'm sure Scotch-Brite does work well on watches, but if you start with a shiny finish, you're not going to have one when you finish with the Scotch-Brite .
 

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Cape cod cloths and any metal polishes are good for the shiney surfaces,the only thing I would NOT recommend is the use of a "Dremmel" as these things can do some serious damage in the wrong hands.

Unlike Terry,Diver 88, I find the sanding pads give a more factory style finish,however I use the 350 grit.The secret is to brush in one direction only.A quick rub with 00 steel wool will complete the job.(Note.Must be 00 or 000 steel wool,not the stuff under the sink.These two are used for polishing timber so are very fine.)

When you are doing bracelets ensure you mask the shiney bits or the brushed bits depending on the finishing you are doing.

Another good item is a fibre glass scratch pen available from jewellery supplies.These are ideal for light spot touch ups.

Another good tip is just leave it alone and only do it once a year as you will get into a habbit of trying to keep it pristine all the time.
 
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