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I have a 1960 Bull's Eye pocket watch. Its been sitting in a drawer for many years and probably could use a cleaning and oiling. The pocket watch has no jewels that I can see. The watch runs great. What would be a good oil to use on a watch that has no jewels? Would a synthetic with Teflon work? I read that slick 50 synthetic has Teflon and works well as a spring lube. The theory being the Teflon would act as bearings since no jewels are present. bullseyeback.jpg bullseyefront.jpg ?
 

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I 'm not familiar with slick 50 , but as long as it's very light and you use VERY little , it shouldn't hurt . Make sure to keep the oil away from the balance spring ( the piece that goes back and forth )
 

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Although this "dollar" watch was never meant to be oiled, a VERY slight amount of light oil such as sewing machine oil or even slick 50 applied with the end of a toothpick to the visible pivots shouldn't hurt. Dip the toothpick end in the oil and then blot the drop on a paper, then touch the end to the pivots.
 

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I have a 1960 Bull's Eye pocket watch. Its been sitting in a drawer for many years and probably could use a cleaning and oiling. The pocket watch has no jewels that I can see. The watch runs great. What would be a good oil to use on a watch that has no jewels? Would a synthetic with Teflon work? I read that slick 50 synthetic has Teflon and works well as a spring lube. The theory being the Teflon would act as bearings since no jewels are present. View attachment 23028 View attachment 23029 ?
Welcome to the American botsmaker...

That little guy is a "Dollar Watch" and there are a bunch of us
who have them.

Here is a whole thread on them.
http://www.watchtalkforums.info/forums/american-watch-forum/32785.htm

Enjoy, relax and have fun in the forum.
 
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