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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I wasn't sure what was the proper forum so please move as appropriate.

Anyway I just came into possession of a Wakmann triple date with a Valjoux 730 movement. I am trying to find out more about the watch and the lack of information is staggering. Just the history of Wakmann alone is up for debate at the different sites I have been too. Some say it was an arm of Breitling, others that it was a separate company that was a name on watch buying movements and putting it's own case on Gigandet watches. I can't even find out what the 73.1308.21 on the back of the watch is. Some sites say it is the case size, others say it refers to the caliber. I can't even find the serial number. Also any impressions of the Valjoux 730 movement like how robust it is would also be helpful.

If anyone can answer any of these questions I would be thankful. The watch is beautiful and I can't wait to get it serviced and start wearing it as one of my daily watches. I attached a few shots so you can get an idea of the watch in question.


Watch Analog watch Light Natural material Watch accessory
Watch Analog watch White Light Watch accessory
Watch Analog watch Watch accessory Clock Material property
Watch Analog watch Clock Watch accessory Font
 

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This ain't much, but...

Part of the confusion stems from the fact that Wakmann was originally a European watch distributor who re-located to the USA! And one of the brands he distributed was, in fact Breitling. It was after World War II that the Wakmann name started appearing on the dials of watches they assembled themselves. Movements from several sources in and around Switzerland were used, the most famous being Valjoux. And according to author and Rolex expert Jeff Hess on the N.A.W.C.C. website, Charles Gigandet was at one time the owner of Wakmann Watch Co.
(No, I have no idea what happened to Mister Icko Wakmann)

And don't worry about the robustness of the 730 movement. It is the most widely used of the Valjoux movts. containing a month/day/date complication.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am trying to find a manual explaining how to use the stop watch (set, start, stop and and reset) and to set all the functions. Also I am still interested in finding out what the numbers on the back mean.
 

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A picture's worth 1000 words...

...and moving pictures are worth 10,000. Bing/Google/YouTube have hours of video available. Just type in "How to Use a Chronograph Watch". Lots of sites have instructions in print as well. As for the 73.1308.21 it describes your movement. Maybe one of our watchmaker members can give specifics on the individual numbers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It went for overhaul today. I should have pics posted next week with it in all it's cleaned and done glory. I am still a newbie at this and help would be nice. I know about Google and You Tube but unfortunately the images I am getting are for quartz battery chronos. I found one page on the Wakmann and it showed the pushers, but no info on the other functions. Since it's a three dial it's a tad more complicated than many too. Anyway there will be more as i get it. If anyone has a manual for it and would be nice enough to scan it I would be very grateful.
 

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TRANSLATION:
We understand if you're anxious to get your watch back ASAP, but a one week turnaround is a suspiciously short period of time, even if yours is the ONLY piece he has to work on. It is better to find a repairman who will take his time to get the job done properly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I found him on eBay and he's local to me. Not every watch is a one week turnaround, but 2 weeks seems to be his limit. He does great work and his prices are low. I don't want to shill for him here, but he's all I wanted in a watchmaker/repair.
 

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Hey- if you're happy with his work, that's all that is important. The fact his prices are low is icing on the cake. Once he realizes you're a repeat customer
of his, you might even start getting preferential treatment like further discounts, repair/replacement parts "at cost", etc. It's nice to have "a steady watchguy" you can take your problems to!
 

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I just came into the exact same watch, however it doesn't work but all the parts seem to be there. It looks to me like it would be worth fixing as I would love to have an old wind up watch. Please I'd love to hear how your watch turned out and if anyone might have an idea what the high end would be to fix something like this.
 

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"Breitling: History of a Great Brand of Watches", Wakmann was the US distributor of Breitling watches from the 1940s to the 1970s. Some watches were co-signed Breitling/Wakmann as well as just Wakmann but made by Breitling. I would guess that this relationship is similar to the Longines/Wittnauer relationship i.e. the US distributor of a Swiss brand also selling its own brand. There were cockpit clocks made bearing both names...



I have had my Wakmann for about 40 years and even though I rarely wear it I could pick it up put it on and know that it still works perfectly.
 

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I have a Wakmann that my father gave me back in the early 60s. There was a big blue catalog by Bennett Bros out of NY which sold just about everything and I think the Wakmann came from it. My father was into aviation and loved watches, his favorite being the accutron because it was so accurate.
I’ve read that Breitling was connected to Wakmann. An interesting story I heard a number of years ago was that the owner of Breitling had fallen on hard times and Philadelphia watch distributor, Mort Clayman, lent Breitling the money to stay in business.
 

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Photos are a good thing and always welcomed around these parts! :001_smile:

I have a Wakmann that my father gave me back in the early 60s. There was a big blue catalog by Bennett Bros out of NY which sold just about everything and I think the Wakmann came from it. My father was into aviation and loved watches, his favorite being the accutron because it was so accurate.
I’ve read that Breitling was connected to Wakmann. An interesting story I heard a number of years ago was that the owner of Breitling had fallen on hard times and Philadelphia watch distributor, Mort Clayman, lent Breitling the money to stay in business.
 
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