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Discussion Starter #1
First off, I primarily wear a Rolex tool watch (only complication is a single date function) and some of you may recall that I started a Thread here noting that my wristwatch must do what I do. Period.

But now I have a gentler soul headed my way: A vintage 2-dial chronograph that's only a couple of years younger than I am. Mind you, I have no intention of testing its water integrity, beyond the proverbial splash and such in washing my hands before meals. But I do plan on getting out and about w/ it for a week or so, which could include shoveling or blowing snow to clear our Michigan walkways here, and maybe some minor handyman stuff around the house.

Any reactions to this? I've heard chronographs can be sensitive creatures, and I'd like to keep this one running well. :blushing:

Although I've decided to Post this as a more General question, the piece we're talking about is a mid-1960s Breitling Top Time. Does that make a difference?

Thanks for any and all feedback! Look for images at some point in the next week or two as my current Grail success.
 

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I'm just offering my opinion.

Subject your Rolex to the harsh realities of the rough and tumble world.

Save the Breitling for more the finer moments in life.

I wouldn't needlessly stress a fine old watch regardless of what it was originally designed for.

Others might advise differently.
 

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I agree. While I do require most of my watches to be tough as nails and water resistant to the depths of Long Island Sound, there's nothing wrong with having a piece that's so precious, it only comes out for select special occasions.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks. So chronographs are inherently less robust than those w/ fewer complications? To what degree? :001_unsure:
 

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Thanks. So chronographs are inherently less robust than those w/ fewer complications? To what degree? :001_unsure:
I think it is the age of the watch that has us suggesting taking it easy on the Breitling.

Many robust wristwatches feature chronographs. A few that come to mine are Kobold, Anonimo, Ball, Sinn, and Breitling.

As your Breitling is a special piece, it was recommended to give it a lighter work load.

I have a 1958 Universal Geneve Polerouter. Designed as a tool watch but by today's standards more of a dress look. It is sealed up like a tank and I worry not when wearing it, but I wouldn't do anything too physical in it.
 

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Chronographs are not necessarily more ticklish than a regular three-hand. They, too, can take a pounding. Chronos are usually used for sporting activities and a designed to stand up to abuse.
While I wouldn't pound nails in a prized Breitling (or any other beloved model), I wouldn't go out of my way to baby the watch.
Dress watches are a different thing all together. But to me chronos are sports watches.
 

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I agree with boscoe.

There's no reason to believe that your Breitling is any less robust today than it was the day it first came off the assembly line.... C'mon, a Breitling was the watch used by our first US Astronauts.

It may be slightly more prone to magnetic influences because that's where the technology has gone, but Incabloc type protection and anti-magnetic for the era probably makes your watch very robust and not required to be babied.

I bought this in 1965, and it has never failed....I still wear it in the rotation..

 
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