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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yesterday (I think) I posted saying I made the decision to finally start my watch collection with a vintage Girard Perregaux Gyromatic. I didn't know anything about the watch then, other than it appeared suitable for the sort of professional occasions to which I've previously felt ridiculous wearing my seiko diver.

Watch collecting, I suspect, will become equally a hobby of continually educating oneself in addition to the actual procurement of interesting pieces. Being so, there is still quite a bit I don't know about the watch so if anyone more knowledgeable than myself could assist in filling in those blanks I'd appreciate it.

I've also noticed everyone here loves pictures:
100_0110.jpg 100E0114.jpg 100E0116.jpg 100E0120.jpg 100E0121.jpg

The movement, I understand, is Girard Perregaux's in house GP31 (GP32 w/date) and it is considered to be the most successful of all GP's "gyromatic" movements. It was actually utilized in GP watches from 1962 to 1975. It is much thinner than its predecessor the GP21/21 and was offered in a variety of different beat rates, ranging from 21,600 to 36,000 in the high frequency Gyromatic.

My particular GP Gyromatic is stainless steel and uses the GP31 movement (no date), which I think I might actually prefer as I understand the GP32 also had no manual wind option or quick set function for the date. My watch shows some wear on the case where it comes into contact with the caseback, however, the movement seems to be clean and runs perfectly so I hope this is nothing to be too concerned about.

I understand Girard Perregaux to be one the oldest watchmakers still in existence. They actually created the first commercial wristwatch in 1880. It also seems evident that vintage and contemporary Girard Perregaux's occupy vastly different price ranges. Today the watches are considered high end, but where exactly did these mid 60s pieces fit in relative to other makers like Longines, Hamilton, Tag Heuer, or Omega? Is there a reason these watches seem scarcely represented on these forums?
 

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Yesterday (I think) I posted saying I made the decision to finally start my watch collection with a vintage Girard Perregaux Gyromatic. I didn't know anything about the watch then, other than it appeared suitable for the sort of professional occasions to which I've previously felt ridiculous wearing my seiko diver.
Good - a decent mechanical dress watch should be a requirement for a gentleman. :thumbup1:

Watch collecting, I suspect, will become equally a hobby of continually educating oneself in addition to the actual procurement of interesting pieces. Being so, there is still quite a bit I don't know about the watch so if anyone more knowledgeable than myself could assist in filling in those blanks I'd appreciate it.
Here's all the basic information - it's a sticky at the top of this forum: http://www.watchtalkforums.info/forums/general-discussion-forum/22496.htm

I've also noticed everyone here loves pictures:
Yes, we do. The more the merrier. BIG pictures, little pictures, COLOR pictures, or black & white pictures - all are fine with us.

The movement, I understand, is Girard Perregaux's in house GP31 (GP32 w/date) and it is considered to be the most successful of all GP's "gyromatic" movements. It was actually utilized in GP watches from 1962 to 1975. It is much thinner than its predecessor the GP21/21 and was offered in a variety of different beat rates, ranging from 21,600 to 36,000 in the high frequency Gyromatic.

My particular GP Gyromatic is stainless steel and uses the GP31 movement (no date), which I think I might actually prefer as I understand the GP32 also had no manual wind option or quick set function for the date. My watch shows some wear on the case where it comes into contact with the caseback, however, the movement seems to be clean and runs perfectly so I hope this is nothing to be too concerned about.
Have it serviced so the movement is clean & properly lubricated. You don't want to ruin a decent watch through neglect.

I understand Girard Perregaux to be one the oldest watchmakers still in existence. They actually created the first commercial wristwatch in 1880. It also seems evident that vintage and contemporary Girard Perregaux's occupy vastly different price ranges. Today the watches are considered high end, but where exactly did these mid 60s pieces fit in relative to other makers like Longines, Hamilton, Tag Heuer, or Omega? Is there a reason these watches seem scarcely represented on these forums?
Here's a good chart from a magazine Consumer's Union that is now known as Consumer Reports:



Here's a link to the whole article:

Page 1: 1949 Consumer Reports article on watches

Many brands span a wide variety of price ranges with their products, Seiko being the maker who covers the most ground.
 

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According to Ranfft's database, the GP31 is based on the manual wind AS (A. Schilds) caliber 1687/1688 series.
The automatic mechanism that was addes is a joint development of Doxa, Eberhard, Favre-Leuba, Girard-Perregaux, and Zodiac.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Huntershooter, those alarm GPs look great!! And, ulackfocus, thanks so much for that 1949 article; I couldn't imagine a more appropriate response to my question.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hey Tom, I see you're from Waukesha. I'm going to school in Madison. Are there any places near here or Milwaukee that you'd recommend for having my watch serviced?
 
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