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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got the call from my AD. A Black Milgauss standard crystal had arrived. :thumbup:

I know this is a reference that has evoked a lot of feeling, but for me this was one of two watches Rolex debuted this year at Bazel that really caught my eye. (the other being the wonderfull GMT II 116710)

I must say this is watch one has to see and put on to get the complete "experience". The matt dial seems to make the orange seconds hand and accents flow quite well with the luminova markers.
The Milgauss is a thick watch due no doubt to the faraday cage, but it fits the wrist qite well. At 40MM it's the perfect size for me.
The milgauss shares the improved clasp with the easy out link and solid polished centerlink bracelet that is now on the GMT (and Daytona) and gives the watch a wonderfull rich look without being over the top IMHO.

Some meager attempts at photos that simply do not do the watch justice.











Compared to the 116710,





And on the wrist,

 

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i'm loving the chunky appearance mike:001_tt1:, would you say its has the thickest profile of the rolex line, good lume in comparison to the current SD mine was always a disappointment especially the hands!!

congrats mate

steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
i'm loving the chunky appearance mike:001_tt1:, would you say its has the thickest profile of the rolex line, good lume in comparison to the current SD mine was always a disappointment especially the hands!!

congrats mate

steve
Steve, I haven't measured them yet, but I'd say if it isn't it's awfully close.
Here's a pic of the SD next to the 116710 to compare to the Milgauss - GMT pic.

 

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Mike's is the best example I've seen yet.

http://watchtalkforums.info/forums/showpost.php?p=7582&postcount=1

The black dial with the white baton markers appeal more to me and the second hand is growing on me.

However, I still maintain that a watch with special anti-magnetic features shouldn't have to scream that, especially in the age of quartz watches that are immune to such influences.
 

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Congrats Mike, wear it in good health!

@MrGradyPhilpott: Quartz watches are not immune to magnetic influence. They are just as susceptible to errors due to strong magnetic field.
 

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I like it but i don't like the concept of NO date or day display, seriously, is that too much to ask :confused1:
I'm thinking that those would diminish the anti-magnetic qualities.
 

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@MrGradyPhilpott: Quartz watches are not immune to magnetic influence. They are just as susceptible to errors due to strong magnetic field.
My mistake.

Quartz watch accuracy can be disrupted by magnetic fields, however, after being removed from the magnetic source, they return to normal time keeping.

Some quartz watches are anti-magnetic, too.

Mechanical watches that are subjected to magnetic fields may require being degaussed before they will become accurate again.

ANTI-MAGNETIC: Under Federal Trade Commission rules, a watch is considered anti-magnetic if it is placed in an electrical field of 60 qauss [sic] (electromagnetic units) for a least five seconds in each of the two positions and the daily rates does not move by more than fifteen seconds.

An analog quartz or combination quartz watch/clock, in which the motor drive system using the nature of a magnet to move the hands is adopted, may also stop, or lose or gain time if the normal rotation of the motor is affected by strong magnetism from the outside. Such a watch/clock that does not keep correct time due to magnetism is not faulty; therefore it get back its original accuracy when located away from the magnetism. Use it after resetting the correct time.

A mechanical watch/clock may also lose or gain time temporarily under strong magnetism, though it is not as prominent as a quartz watch/clock. Digital watches/clocks, having no motor and gear mechanism, will not stop, or lose or gain time under a magnetic influence.

If your watch/clock has encountered a strong magnetic field, the parts of it may be magnetized. If magnetism remains in your watch/clock, it can be restored to its original condition by demagnetization. For demagnetizing your watch/clock, contact your nearest distributor.
 

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Mike you're unstoppable. :D

That's really fine Milgauss. It's a legendary model for sure... and this new one pays really nice tribute to it.
 

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I like it but i don't like the concept of NO date or day display, seriously, is that too much to ask :confused1:
I'm weird, I love no-dates.

No date Sub is much nicer than the cyclops version, imho. And this comes from the owner of the date version.
 

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Congrats Mike, that is a beautiful watch. I'm 99% on the same model for myself next year, no supply problems from my AD, i just need to decide if it will look ok on my skinny wrist!
Your pics are great and totally do that watch justice.
Wear it well, and never fear a magnetic field again!
:thumbup:
 

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My mistake.

Quartz watch accuracy can be disrupted by magnetic fields, however, after being removed from the magnetic source, they return to normal time keeping.

Some quartz watches are anti-magnetic, too.

Mechanical watches that are subjected to magnetic fields may require being degaussed before they will become accurate again.

ANTI-MAGNETIC: Under Federal Trade Commission rules, a watch is considered anti-magnetic if it is placed in an electrical field of 60 qauss [sic] (electromagnetic units) for a least five seconds in each of the two positions and the daily rates does not move by more than fifteen seconds.

An analog quartz or combination quartz watch/clock, in which the motor drive system using the nature of a magnet to move the hands is adopted, may also stop, or lose or gain time if the normal rotation of the motor is affected by strong magnetism from the outside. Such a watch/clock that does not keep correct time due to magnetism is not faulty; therefore it get back its original accuracy when located away from the magnetism. Use it after resetting the correct time.

A mechanical watch/clock may also lose or gain time temporarily under strong magnetism, though it is not as prominent as a quartz watch/clock. Digital watches/clocks, having no motor and gear mechanism, will not stop, or lose or gain time under a magnetic influence.

If your watch/clock has encountered a strong magnetic field, the parts of it may be magnetized. If magnetism remains in your watch/clock, it can be restored to its original condition by demagnetization. For demagnetizing your watch/clock, contact your nearest distributor.
Grady - many quartz watches (the multi-function digital types especially) have circuit boards and chips which could be permanently damaged by a magnetic field, depending on its strength and perhaps the length of exposure. Unless it is specifically hardened against magnetic fields, like the Milgauss.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Mike you're unstoppable. :D

That's really fine Milgauss. It's a legendary model for sure... and this new one pays really nice tribute to it.
Thanks JP.:thumbup: I'm REALLY liking this one.:001_tt1:
 
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