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Hi guys, I have a question and any help or tips would be grateful!

We replace watch batteries on a fairly steady basis, for used watches of all brands.

Our current issue is that it appears that our new batteries are draining all or mostly before we even install them!
We store them in a suitcase. Each size battery is stored together in mini baggies or small fishing tackle style boxes.
We usually remove them from the individual packaging because it allows for space saving.
Ive never had an issue before (in the last 3 months) with drainage of mass quantity but lately they're all dead!

Is it the storage? Are they draining by being against each other in storage?
Is it too hot? (It's basic room temperature with AC on during weekdays)
Are they just dud batteries? (usually bought from China in 100 qty packages)

Any help from a pro or someone who just knows would be awesome. Thanks everyone!
Michelle
 

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I dont know a lot about the bulk batteries you are buying, but I used to have a similar problem with storing camera batteries back in the day. A professor I had in college told me the trick he found worked best was cold storage. I stored in the refrigerator from that point on, and never had another issue with it. Im sure someone with more knowledge will come along shortly to help you.


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X2 on refrigerator
Yes, cold storage is the way to go...

Also, cells are packed individually for a reason, to prevent coincidental reaction,
IE, shorts between contacts with other cells that occur in loose, non insulated battery's...

Loose pack in a plastic bag is NOT the way to go! I think you will notice bulk pack cells
should be in a container with the cells all on a flat surface, orientated with the + side
down and with some sort of non conductive cover to hold them secure.

One other thing to consider, silver based cells have a much longer shelf life than the
cheaper chemical cells and have a much less tendency to leak all over your watch
movements if left in a dead condition, internally for a long period, as is the tendency
some watch owners have...

Good luck.
 
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