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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't know about the rest of you, but I would love to have a high-quality diver like the 300M in quartz so I can just pick it up and hit the water. Does anyone else feel the same way?

I am relatively new to the Lum-Tec community and just pre-ordered my first two watches this month. I searched around and don't think they've offered a serious quartz diver before, but maybe I missed it -- if so, my apologies.
 

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i agree

i am a quartz guy

i have a 4 watch winder

it will be full in a few weeks

that will leave a couple more autos w/o a winder spot

when the rest of my inbound arrive

If i had one or two watches, no problem, but i really like quartz for no mainantce

my two satang
 

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I think the problem is that most people see quartz as the movement of cheap watches and frankly $600-700 isn't cheap. I absolutely love my M57 and as someone who swaps watches daily quartz worked best for me but if I had one regular watch I wore all the time then it would be automatic all the way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I think the problem is that most people see quartz as the movement of cheap watches and frankly $600-700 isn't cheap. I absolutely love my M57 and as someone who swaps watches daily quartz worked best for me but if I had one regular watch I wore all the time then it would be automatic all the way.
I totally agree, Luminated. I think the general perception of quartz as cheap is really too bad though. Especially as high-end brands are all phasing out their high-accuracy thermocompensated quartz lines, I feel like there is a hole in the market for great quartz watches -- especially tool watches like divers. That doesn't mean I don't love my automatics and mechanicals.
 

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I will admit to having a bias against quartz watches. The only quartz watch I own is a Rolex OysterQuartz I inherited from my dad, a dozen years ago: I keep it for sentimental reasons (to give to a grandchild), but the watch is a style clunker, and it costs about $600 to have the battery replaced every three/four years. They only made about 25,000 of these watches, so I guess it's something of a novelty item.

Apart from just the snob issue related to quartz movements (my personal prejudices), it bothers me that there's no way to judge when your battery-powered watch is going to stop and need to be sent off for service. That could be a bummer on a dive trip, some day, for those who don't carry multiple watches when they travel. Could also be interesting "at depth," although any watch can stop for any number of reasons...

Mostly, I just can't get emotionally attached to anything battery-powered; it just goes against everything that winds my horological interests. It's like buying a mechanical dog, with a pull-string that produces barking noises on command. Why bother..?

I can buy a perfectly accurate quartz Timex (or use my cellphone) to tell the time, if that's all wearing a watch (timekeeping) is reduced to. Spending many hundreds of dollars on a quartz-movement watch is incomprehensible to me.

Apologies to all my quartz-loving friends; like I said, this is just my hangup, and I know I'm in the minority.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I can relate to both sides of the quartz vs. automatic argument pretty clearly. As you say, Ladd, it's totally a personal preference. For me, the magic lives in the tiny gears of mechanical watches, while quartz can provide highly accurate tool watches.

...it bothers me that there's no way to judge when your battery-powered watch is going to stop and need to be sent off for service. That could be a bummer on a dive trip, some day, for those who don't carry multiple watches when they travel.
On your concern about battery life though, most good quartz watches these days have a battery life indicator whereby the second hand starts moving differently to let you know it is time to send it in for service. Handy for exactly the reasons you mention!
 

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Good points, NAD (not a doctor). :thumbup1: I had no idea about the battery life indicator.

My dislike for quartz is irrational, I guess.

I just sort of think that the phrase "tool watch" -- which conveys multiple meanings, to me -- is evocative of the Pentagon's $800 toilet seats and $1100 hammers ("human-powered impact device, metal") and it's just hard for me to wrap my mind around paying a premium for a time-keeping hammer.

I love my "Orange Monster" Seiko, which is a "tool watch," to be sure, but it's got radical personality, and I love everything about it, to include its quirky, almost impossible to regulate, 7S26 movement.

It took me three days of tweaking to get my monster to within +/- 5 seconds, and any sort of occupational "whack" (while diving, etc.) will quickly return it to it's +/- 20 seconds per day standard. It's a tool watch, as you say, with a bomb-proof, workhorse movement, so hairsplitting a few seconds isn't something I really care about, when +/- fifteen minutes is something I'm thinking about on my dive tank @ sixty feet.

I WILL SAY that every Lum-Tec I've purchased keeps time to within +5 seconds a day, and I won't have a watch that loses time -- another sign of a latent personality disorder. :lol:

It may seem like I'm pressing the point, but I don't mean to. Really, I'd like to be persuaded that I'm wrong about this, but nothing has changed my mind, so far, or convinced me that quartz watches ("tools") are worth more than what you'd pay for any decent power tool at Home Depot. Quartz watches starting at $600 just don't compute for me.

Thanks for the debate. I get where you're coming from, too; guess it's just an emotional thing with me.
 

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On your concern about battery life though, most good quartz watches these days have a battery life indicator whereby the second hand starts moving differently to let you know it is time to send it in for service. Handy for exactly the reasons you mention!
Yeah all my quartz watches jump a second when the battery is about to die and this will go on for several days before kicking the bucket. My dearest quartz was a Breitling Aerospace which I traded for a Superocean, a decision I deeply regretted.

I love my "Orange Monster" Seiko, which is a "tool watch," to be sure, but it's got radical personality, and I love everything about it, to include its quirky, almost impossible to regulate, 7S26 movement.
Funny you brought up this watch because I just received the new version with new movement this morning and posted a pic of it on the Japanese watch section. I bought it as a tool watch and something for holidays that will take the abuse of swimming, suntan lotion, etc and not cost the earth.
 

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For me: I'ts the perception. When they were introduced, quartz was a new, space-age step forward that almost single-handedly wiped out the Swiss mechanical watch industry. As they became sooo common & the prices dropped to dirt cheap, the perception turned to "anyone can make a quartz watch, but a mechanical requires craftsmanship". They both have plusses/minuses; but for me, it's the RELATIVE exclusivity of an auto vs the commonality of the quartz. When plastic was first introduced, same thing--it was a space age versatile wonder product that today is synonomous with "cheap". I have about the same number of quartzes & autos, but I hardly ever wear the quartzes. It really is kinda just a "snob" thing. Hmmm...maybe I'll put aside my 300M for a day or 2 & revisit some of those quartzes..
 

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Lume-Dude,

I've had this Orange Monster for a little over a decade. Can't remember when they were first available, but I had to have one. I thought they were the ugliest things I'd ever seen, and it was love at first sight. :thumbup:

You know how it is when you hear a pop song, and you like it right away, and -- after about twenty "top ten" plays, you want to shoot yourself? The OM was a love/hate thing the first month I had it, but now it's one of my all-time favorite watches. Wearing it just makes me want to grin, stupidly, whenever I look at it. I never get tired of looking at it, especially at night, when it turns into a rocket in the dark at zero-dark-zero! It's the only watch that REALLY gives Lum-Tec an after-dark run for the money.

Just a fun watch that -- like you said -- you don't have to agonize about at the beach.
 

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For me: I'ts the perception. When they were introduced, quartz was a new, space-age step forward that almost single-handedly wiped out the Swiss mechanical watch industry. As they became sooo common & the prices dropped to dirt cheap, the perception turned to "anyone can make a quartz watch, but a mechanical requires craftsmanship". They both have plusses/minuses; but for me, it's the RELATIVE exclusivity of an auto vs the commonality of the quartz. When plastic was first introduced, same thing--it was a space age versatile wonder product that today is synonomous with "cheap". I have about the same number of quartzes & autos, but I hardly ever wear the quartzes. It really is kinda just a "snob" thing. Hmmm...maybe I'll put aside my 300M for a day or 2 & revisit some of those quartzes..
Yup, exactly.

But, for me, it's also something non-financial. Auto/mechanicals are "organic" because they've got beating hearts, and they're powered by human energy (either wound or kinetic). You can hear the beat, and it's something every member of the animal kingdom can relate to in the dark -- maybe especially in the dark -- because we've heard a resonant beat since before we realized our hands were attached to our bodies. I feel that way about the ocean, with its comforting surf-beat, and its salts which are identical (salt/water ratio) to human blood. So, it's a primordial thing, with me, having a spring-driven instrument next to the pulse in my wrist.

Then I'm just fascinated by the mounds of interlocking notched wheels, and the improbability of their being able to measure time accurately -- Like the dripping water clocks of antiquity, or Galileo's invention of the pendulum in the 1500s, I can relate to the relationships of timekeeping.

Vibrating crystals? Not so much. Great for outer space moon-shots -- like "atomic clocks," but they affect me in about the same way. Bored.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yeah all my quartz watches jump a second when the battery is about to die and this will go on for several days before kicking the bucket. My dearest quartz was a Breitling Aerospace which I traded for a Superocean, a decision I deeply regretted.
Luminated, those Breitling quartz watches are beautiful. They are some of the last super accurate Swiss thermocompensated watches around. That is something I am absolutely willing to pay a premium for. If Lum-Tec ever announces a thermocompensated line, I will be pre-ordering immediately! :biggrin:
 

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Personally, I have an aversion to Qz movements unless they do something special in terms of complications, or accuracy. I have a Seiko SBQJ015 Perpetual Calendar GMT, which is extremely accurate, and I like the perpetual calendar thing, I have an old Victorinox beater, which I wear if I have very unpleasant manual tasks to do, and I have incoming an Ocean 7 LM-5 CQ, which is a Qz chronograph with big date and rotating 12 hr bezel (more watches should have this). Everything else has a mechanical movement. As I've said before, I particularly shudder when I see the M58/59/60 range, which I feel "cheapen" my M27. But that's just me
 

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I never get tired of looking at it, especially at night, when it turns into a rocket in the dark at zero-dark-zero! It's the only watch that REALLY gives Lum-Tec an after-dark run for the money.

Just a fun watch that -- like you said -- you don't have to agonize about at the beach.
I compared its lumes to my M57 and its still the Lumtec that hold the crown of top luminator, both in instant brightness and after 10 minutes though after a couple of hours I reckon it was taking the lead which might be the green instead of orange lumes. Love both but for completely different reasons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I think the opposite is true, these others make your M27 more unique and special, as such its value IMO has went up accordingly since their introduction.
I have to agree. I'm hoping they release another GMT auto as I'm sure the secondary market is putting a premium on the M27. As it stands, it is definitely a watch I'd like to pick up. I'd pre-order a new cobalt version in a heartbeat.
 

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For me, i dont set/track my watches w/i a few seconds...

I like the quartz because i dont have to set them...

I have a nice watch winder w/ four slots

I have two slots left and 4 (maybe 5 depending on a cetain bronzo :) inbound autos

I may or may not keep 1 or 2, still leaves me w/ an auto or two with no "winder" home

I KNOW alot of you like to pick up, tinker, wind, relieve stress etc by winding, stetting etc
Good on ya :)

Me, i am a grab and go kinda guy

Love my M54 and Sieko Turtle mod w/ quartz and my Bathys Luna
 

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For me, i dont set/track my watches w/i a few seconds...

I like the quartz because i dont have to set them...

<SNIP>

Me, i am a grab and go kinda guy

Love my M54 and Sieko Turtle mod w/ quartz and my Bathys Luna
I hear you, believe me.

That's the great thing about watch collecting: There's something it it for everybody.

I've purchased and sold three winders, so far. This is because I like to make the same mistakes, over and over again. Helps to keep me humble.

My problem with all of my winders (the last 6 slot Orbita cost north of $2k) is that any auto that's been in the winder for more than a couple of weeks needs to be reset, anyway. D'oh!! Most are off by several minutes, or so, after a month (typically fast) because the winder causes them to run WAY differently than they do on my wrist. So, I take them out of the winder and, after checking that their movements are fully charged -- I reset their minute/seconds hands to my radio clock before I head off for the weekend, or whatever. Being the slow study that I am, it finally occurred to me that I wasn't saving any time, since I was dicking around with resetting them, anyway. I ended up selling my Orbita and buying a "Sturdy" gun safe!

My "MO," recently, has been to wear one watch for several weeks, then wear another for a similar, extended period of time. Winders (my experience, anyway) are all but worthless, in this sort of scenario. Sure, if you're a guy who rotates your autos, daily, then a winder might make some sort of sense. For me, they ended up being turned off and serving as expensive bureau-top display cases. Dumb for my lifestyle. Now I go out into the garage, put on some music, and stare at my gun safe. :lol:
 

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I know this is going to sound like "BS" to you guys, but I think just about any, good quality automatic watch can be nearly as accurate as a quartz movement, once you get to know the peculiarities of your watch's movement, and how, positionally, it was regulated when it was assembled and tested at the factory.

Every watch I've bought from Chris -- and all have had good, or even higher-end ETA movements, 'cept for my current 300M diver -- are running within a couple seconds of "zero" in any 24 hr. period. Every auto/mechanical watch I own can be "positionally regulated" on the nightstand, each night, and it'll be right back to "zero" the following morning. My SCB2, for instance, loses about a second on my wrist during the day, and it gains about a second, face up, on the bedside table, overnight. My V1 gains about a second and a half during the day, and it loses a second and a half, crown-down on the nightstand, overnight. Rinse/lather/repeat with my other Lum-Tec autos. My Soprod-equipped M28 is just stupidly accurate; I can wear it to bed -- never taking it off -- and it will be plus/minus 5 or 6 seconds after a month.

The point is, even great quartz watches are likely to gain/lose a couple seconds a month. Once you learn your automatic watch's "personality," you can keep it just as - if not MORE ACCURATE -- than your quartz watch just by paying attention to its placement on the nightstand, overnight.

All of my watches are "grab and go," once they're wound and on my wrist, since most will run for a couple days -- even the mechanicals -- without a rewind, and they're all going to be within a couple seconds of "dead nuts," once set and worn.

(my deepest apologies to anybody who actually read this entire post from beginning to end, and could have spent the same time, constructively, doing something else)
 
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