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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Obviously there are lots out there for sale from reputable dealers. My question is how would I be able to know which caliber version I was buying? My preference is B. thanks for any help, info.
 

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Why a B? They were the 28,800 bph movements that had some problems.

I think there's a designation on the plate by the balance wheel, or on the edge somewhere.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's the exact reason because I prefer the classic 28,800 BPH. I get a lot of pleasure with that freq converted into the second hand.
 

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OmegaSM said:
That's the exact reason because I prefer the classic 28,800 BPH. I get a lot of pleasure with that freq converted into the second hand.
I wouldn't call 28,800 "classic"
 

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ulackfocus said:
Well, it did come out in the early 70's and rock music from that period is called classic. :T:laugh:
True lol, when I think "classic", I think 18,000 BPH (or whatever 4 beats per second is)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Haha. Yes I suppose you're right, I had plenty of 14400 watches when I was younger. And I'm reminded of those watches, still, whenever I see a co-axial. I really can't get my head around Omega's decision to fix a watch that wasn't broken other than as a marketing tool. When I read about the co-axial design on any Omega website there's all the old marketing buzzwords and it's the best thing since sliced bread. But I still cannot find where this new technology benefits the consumer, other than longer service intervals. I'm quite happy with 3-5 years between servicing. Improved accuracy? Sadly not.
 
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