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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
We found a wristwatch among my recently passed dad’s belongings.
It’s a Jean Cardot 17 Jewels goldstone wind-up watch with the date. It runs.
The back has an etching of a diver, and the words topicalized, stainless steel back, base metal bezel, and diamond tooled.
We have no idea how old it is, or if it’s worth anything. He served in Vietnam in the 60’s, and we don’t know if he picked it up there, or later on. He didn’t talk about his time there, much.
Any information regarding this watch would be greatly appreciated!
225674
225675
 

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Here's what I found, and it's not much:

"Jean Cardot was most likely a “private label” — a brand name bought by a firm (likely in the Virgin Islands or Guam) to produce Soviet-powered watches for sale in the USA. Sometimes, the dials and cases were also made in the USSR, while other times, these parts were manufactured in China. This was a successful enterprise, judging by the wide range of pocket- and wristwatches produced under this marque."

The only way to know for sure how old it is would be if we knew who made the watch's movement AND if we had the serial number engraved on said movement AND the factory had a database where we could look up the date the movement was made.
We don't, and there isn't.
So....I'm gonna have to guesstimate the watch has made around the early-to-mid 1970s. The dial is similar in style to other watches from that era, like my 1970 Hamilton ( small rectangular hour markers and heavy, squared-off hands ) .


225676


A quick scan on eBay reveals a number of different Jean Cardots. Past watches typically sold for WELL UNDER $100.00 which tells me they are not intrinsically valuable. Your father bought it most likely because he liked the way it looks ( and I must admit that it IS a handsome watch! ) and it was priced right.
Congratulations. Not everyone is lucky to have a watch that was inherited from their fathers. The sentimental value is something money cannot replace!
Enjoy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you, so much!
I’d like to keep it. It fits perfectly, and the fact it runs after all this time just tickles me.
 

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If you're going to keep it, and it's mechanical rather than battery-powered, I'd SERIOUSLY consider taking it in to a local watch repair shop and have it cleaned and oiled. The sad fact is that a watch's lubricating oils will dry out over time, become tacky, and attract dirt and dust. And just because it runs now, that could change without warning. Just like you perform regularly scheduled maintenances on your car, you need to do the same with your mechanical watches.
Mine go in for servicing EVERY 6 - 8 years. In fact, since 2005, I've become such a regular customer that the man that owns my local watch repair store usually cuts me a deal and just charges me about 1/3 his normal rate.
 
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