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Okay, this calls for a couple Illinois (and American in general) watch neophyte questions:

1) What makes this model less expensive than the 'better' models? I mean besides things like rarity or case metal. Is the movement a lower quality? I ask because there are models from the brands I'm familiar with that sell for a fraction of other models yet have nearly or exactly the same calibers inside (ie: Omega's late 60's Seamasters vs. Genèves with 55x and 56x calibers, or Longines late 50's Conquest vs. a generic no-name that both have a 19AS inside).

2) Why is this a less popular model? It looks similar to many of the other more expensive offerings of the period for the brand.
 

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I believe frequent availability of the model makes it less desirable, and it is unique because Fred doesn't have it in his book. Most people looking at IL refer to this book and tend to think it is franken or fake. The movement (although nicely decorated) is of lesser quality than more desirable options.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Okay, this calls for a couple Illinois (and American in general) watch neophyte questions:

1) What makes this model less expensive than the 'better' models? I mean besides things like rarity or case metal. Is the movement a lower quality? I ask because there are models from the brands I'm familiar with that sell for a fraction of other models yet have nearly or exactly the same calibers inside (ie: Omega's late 60's Seamasters vs. Genèves with 55x and 56x calibers, or Longines late 50's Conquest vs. a generic no-name that both have a 19AS inside).

2) Why is this a less popular model? It looks similar to many of the other more expensive offerings of the period for the brand.
Good question Dennis.
This model is from 1925. It would be considered (if I am not mistaken) in the "Generic" period of Illinois.
The Star case is fairly common. The movement is nicely decorated, 17J and not overly expensive.
Like Jeff notes below... since it is not in the book, so many people overlook it as a franken
and don't even consider it. I happen to think it is a very nice watch and love wearing mine.
In the Illinois world, there are some models that pop up all the time and others that don't.
Illinois collectors are an interesting bunch... some models command incredible prices and others can be had
for a reasonable price, depending on the model, movement, case material, and rarity.
Fred's book includes lots of "Fantastic Finds"
Stories of folks getting those rarities for a song...
my favorite part of the book!

I believe frequent availability of the model makes it less desirable, and it is unique because Fred doesn't have it in his book.
Most people looking at IL refer to this book and tend to think it is franken or fake. The movement (although nicely decorated)
is of lesser quality than more desirable options.
 

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I wish Fred might have missed a couple more when writing his book, ones of this basic style! :001_tongue: Just kidding of course.......I can't imagine what it took to put together such a compilation of data..........

A wise man once told me, "you shouldn't collect art that doesn't speak to you because then you are an investor or a speculator and not a collector". "If you like it and it turns out to be valuable, then all the better".

Well, I love the look of the "Locke style" of watch and would have wanted one regardless. Generic period or not, I think it is a great presentation. I would highly recommend it to anyone who wants a larger vintage watch from a great manufacturer that makes an impact on your wrist!

Thanks for sharing Greg!:thumbup:
 
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