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We always tell people that "X number of turns of the crown will get your auto going". The Orbita database talks in terms of the number of rotor rotations to fully wind a given movement.

Question; Is there a correlation between the number of crown turns and rotor spins? Or does it vary from movement to movement?
(example- 1 full crown turn = 10 rotor rotations)
 

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winding

I'm sure there's some sort of formula but because there's so many watches and mnsp configurations it's just not worth the time trying to memorize them just give the watch 40 winds and call it a day. I know if you take an eta 2892 and put it on a 4 rpm winder it takes about 4 .5 hours to fully wind it. If you were to look in the Theory of horology book there may be a formula but as I said few people use them. Rik
 

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That's what I was afraid of, but it doesn't cost anything to ask,

Thanks Rik. :thumbup1:
 

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There is a formula based on the size and number of teeth with all the wheels involved so it might be a very different ratio for each movement. I have the book Rik mentioned and can look it up but it wouldn't do any good to anyone unless they knew the specs of each part. It's the same math as with the wheel train ratios except we know the end result there as shown by the bph of the caliber.
 

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Listen

Listen as you wind it.

An automatic mainspring is not fixed inside the barrel. It winds to the max and then slips around inside, traveling across little depressions that hold the lubricant (on ETA's). Once fully wound, the sound will change and you'll hear this extra clicking as it slides inside the barrel. (Not all automatic watches are built like this, but ETA's are)

My hearing is not as good as it once was, but I can hear it with no problem with the case back open and often even once the back is on. Wind it in a quiet room and see if you can hear it.

Steve
 

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Listen as you wind it.

An automatic mainspring is not fixed inside the barrel. It winds to the max and then slips around inside, traveling across little depressions that hold the lubricant (on ETA's). Once fully wound, the sound will change and you'll hear this extra clicking as it slides inside the barrel. (Not all automatic watches are built like this, but ETA's are)

My hearing is not as good as it once was, but I can hear it with no problem with the case back open and often even once the back is on. Wind it in a quiet room and see if you can hear it.

Steve
I can hear the slip on several of my watches, but my Rolex Submariner seems to be completely silent. I assumed this was just a better manufacturing process keeping the watch silent. I also cannot hear the rotor at all on this particular watch. I am interested in whether or not this is the norm for submariners.

Jeff
 
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