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It seems that Invicta does use different grades in the SW200 movement.

I have a COSC Invicta with the SW200 and a Pro diver with the SW200 from Invicta. When I inspect the workings through the rear crystal, I see small differences in the movements. The COSC has some parts that appear to have a more finished coating and the jewels appear larger than the ones in the Pro Diver. The rotor in the COSC has a more finished look than the Pro Divers rotor. The springs also appears different.

The question is, how do you know what grade SW200 you are getting when you purchase from Invicta? There should be one standardized grade for a movement and if not, the grade should be mentioned in the description of the watch as it is presented for sale.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
OK guys, I finally got the SW200 diver back from my watch guy.
He said the pallet stones were dry and needed lube.
Seems to be running really well now.

He also repaired my Russian Chronograph.
Date wheel not working.

He hit me for a $20 for each watch.

Pretty good deal.

-Pete
 

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IMO, the problem lies with how discount brand mechanical and automatic watches like Invictas are being distributed and sold in todays market. Its not the Sellita SW200 movement itself. It's a very good movement if my experience with it is any indication. I intermittently been wearing over 20 watches w/ Sellita SW200 movements in them for over 3 years w/o one problem. They include some Corvette watches built for GM, a couple of Chase Durer models, and a big handful of very carefully picked Invicta Swiss and Swiss made automatics. Every one has been both accurate and reliable. The SW200 movement has proven itself against the Eta 2824 and 2836 movements in other watches I own.

Automatic and mechanical watches are far more complicated to operate and care for in my experience. They are more delicate, and more subject to damage through mishandling than quartz watches. I think a lot of the problem begins here. Too many folks who have owned and worn only relatively rugged and easily handled quartz models are now buying automatic watches and going though a relatively unsupported learning phase based on trial and error. So quite a few are inadvertantly damaging their newly acquired automatics and returning them for a credit, a replacement, or a refund. These defective and/or damaged watches are then being resold by some fairly unscroupulous dealers and distributors on other unsuspecting and uninformed buyers.

So part of the problem also lies with Invicta and how it handles its business including warranty service. Invicta warranty service apparently depends upon the distributorships to handle it for them and possibly on some contracted but inadequate repair service as well. These companies are not providing competant service and are not spending what is needed to have the work done well, or are not having it done at all. All too often, they are simply swapping one bad watch for another to unsuspecting clients or shipping the watch back unrepaired.

I have learned to be extremely careful and very selective about accepting any newly purchased watch from any online or TV vender. This is especially true with mechanicals and automatics and in particular, any watches from Invicta. I've had zero problems since I learned to do this. My standards are based on knowledge gained through experience. I've been carefully examining every new purchase for signs of previous use. I've also been running accuracy and reliability performance tests on each new watch. My acceptance standards have become increasingly stringent as well, until they now have proven to be a 100% reliable safeguard.

I recommend that any new buyer first learn how to properly operate and care for a mechanical or automatic watch before buying one. Ignorance is not bliss when it comes to watches. I also strongly recommend any buyer carefully look over any newly purchased watch with a loupe or 10X magnifying glass for signs of previous use or shop wear. Immediately reject any that arrive unwrapped and that show any evidence of handling, damage, or wear. Test each new purchase carefully and thoroughly. If the newly purchased watch shows the least bit of trouble in function and performance, send it back, esprcially if its an Invicta. We cannot trust the Invicta warranty, so don't risk it.

If new buyers learn to closely examine and test every new watch before keeping it, then the monkey business of some of these less than honest distributors and dealers will stop. The sooner, the better for all of us IMO. Until then, these dishonest venders will continue to benefit from the inexperience and ignorance of their more unsuspecting customers. CAVEAT EMPTOR!!!
 

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Well, its my experience that all watch companys produce bad watches. I've bought three Rolex watches, out of the three one was defective, that a 33.9 % fail rate. Infact so defective, once paid for and purchased it was to be sized and the time set. It could not be set because when the crown unscrewed it came completley off the stem (very poor QC), refund was made instantly.

Anayway your enire rant is unfounded opinon of yours only. NOT FACT.

Were still waitng on those pics of your 150 Invicta watch collection.

You said you wear over 20 watches with the sw200 movement in them. Could we see those also please?
 

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Wow. Great news! Even better than I predicted :T

OK guys, I finally got the SW200 diver back from my watch guy.
He said the pallet stones were dry and needed lube.
Seems to be running really well now.

He also repaired my Russian Chronograph.
Date wheel not working.

He hit me for a $20 for each watch.

Pretty good deal.

-Pete
 

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Really it is. I have to say I was wondering what the outcome would be with the movement. Also I'm not gonna spek for the OP but I don't believe he would blame Invicta for this problem but rather the supplier Sellita for providing Invicta with a defective or unlubricated movement.

SS, were still waiting to see your collection of 150 Invicta watches.
 

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Although I have had issues with customer service, I must say that I have never had an SW200 problem. I currently have 3 pro divers with SW200 movements (9937-9938-3824), and they all perform extremely well. They are all about 2-3 years old. Perhaps the quality has gone down in recent times.
 

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Really it is. I have to say I was wondering what the outcome would be with the movement. Also I'm not gonna spek for the OP but I don't believe he would blame Invicta for this problem but rather the supplier Sellita for providing Invicta with a defective or unlubricated movement.

SS, were still waiting to see your collection of 150 Invicta watches.

Would you consider my rainbow,,I hope I could see a Christmas tree from silent Lam,,,LOL,,:laugh::laugh:

 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Really it is. I have to say I was wondering what the outcome would be with the movement. Also I'm not gonna spek for the OP but I don't believe he would blame Invicta for this problem but rather the supplier Sellita for providing Invicta with a defective or unlubricated movement.
I don't wish to blame anyone. -We- don't know if the movement came from Seleta this way or Invicta in some way botched it up. I will say that I have had my share of problems with the SW200 in Invicta watches and I have shy-ed away from them as a result. I will also say that when they are running correctly they are pretty amazing time keepers.
 

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Oris and others also use the Sellita SW200, and I don't recall heraing of any issues with those. Strange.
 

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Lube problems can be fairly common with automatic and mechanical watches, especially with high volume discount models like Pro Divers that can sit in inventory for long periods of time. This is why a careful run up with the watch oriented in several positions is always wise. Doing so helps redistribute the lube to the moving parts.

An extended stay in an overly hot storage area like a shipping container can cause lube to dry out. Something similar could have been the cause of the problem with this particualr watch, allthough it does not explain the defect in the date changing mechanism. However, mishandling could. Resetting the date around 12:00 AM on the dial can easily damage the mechcanism. This is the kind of mistake a new and uninformed buyer can make. This watch could have been a damaged return like I was referring to in my initial post.

PS, I have to ask. 2156, are you on drugs or something? Not every post of more than two sentences is a rant. Mine certainly wasn't. Perhaps you should learn the difference. Then you might be able to avoid buying a bad Rolex like you claim. However, drugs could explain that too. One out of three defective new Rolexes??? Maybe it was a bad trip and just a figment of your hallucinations. I've never heard of it happening to anyone but you.
 
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