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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am very new to the Invicta watch line. I wanted a nice watch with an automatic movement and did a lot of looking and reading. The one thing that became clear was that the Swiss ETA 2824-2 movement was by far the best value in any automatic movement with years of sales and lots of high end customers to verify the quality. In any grade, it seem to be a beast and any good repairman knows it and can get parts for it. Many watch companies build there reputaions on this movement. But the price of these watches were out of my buget. I like quality but also like a real value. Then I discovered the Invicta Swiss Automaics. After looking around, I bought a 99% like new first issue 9938 from a guy on e-Bay. I got it for $250.00 and was amazed at the quality. Heavy-Duty!!! I started looking for another Invicta Swiss to get for my birthday!

But, said to say, I have learned that the new Swiss Invictas now have a subjective nock-off of the ETA 2824-2. Why on Earth would the brains that brought this super-duper value of a watch sacrifice such an obvious gold mine of a nitch and risk there reputation on an unknown copy-movement for the same price as the original????

I have read about a lot of problems with this movement and have to question this move. Am I missing something, or does someone at Invicta need a wake-up call?
 

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Hi CECIL, welcome to the Invicta WTF. From what I have heard Swatch now has exclusive rights to the ETA movements making it impossible to get watches with that movement in the Invicta line unless it is an older model. I may be incorrect on this comment but I am sure I heard that somewhere.
 

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Hi CECIL, welcome to the Invicta WTF. From what I have heard Swatch now has exclusive rights to the ETA movements making it impossible to get watches with that movement in the Invicta line unless it is an older model. I may be incorrect on this comment but I am sure I heard that somewhere.


Swatch will provide movements to other vendors until 2010 although the amount of movements will decrease by year. That may change as the EU has the right to contest that agreement which may delay it by 6 years or more.


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My understanding is that Invicta is still a registered user of ETA but due to the shortage of ETA movements Invicta has opted to use the SW200 movements in their automatic line. However the SW200 is a great movement in it's own right. The Selita company has been doing finishing work on ETA movements for years and have a unique knowledge of these movements. As a matter of fact a number of high profile companies use this movement in their watches Chase Duer, Oris, Gevril, and Brietling just to name a few. Actually not only are the Selita SW200 very accurate but many are COSC certified as well. So rest assured the SW200 is a fine movement.:thumbup1:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So, in the long run, with limited amount of ETA movements, do you see an ETA/Invicta going up in value?
 

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Sellitas, the manufacturer of the SW200, 26-Jewel automatic movement that Invicta is now using (as is Chase-Durer, Oris and Breitling) was contracted for quite a period of time to make the ETA 2824 movements for ETA. They are virtually identical.

The "questionable" portion of the SW200 has been with some crown issues, due to their initial inexperience with casing (they were simply making the movements for ETA). This has been addressed and should be a non-factor soon. As far as reliablility, I own 5 SW200 movement timepieces and have had only 1 issue, which I believe was a rotor issue, not with the actual movement since it would run when hand wound, but not when placed on a winder. The SW200s are very accurate, in fact, the COSC Admiral I have for sale has the SW200 movement.

As more and more Invictas have the SW200 movement, I am sure you will see the stories of reliability (or lack thereof) develop.

Hope that helps!!!!
 

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Sellitas, the manufacturer of the SW200, 26-Jewel automatic movement that Invicta is now using (as is Chase-Durer, Oris and Breitling) was contracted for quite a period of time to make the ETA 2824 movements for ETA. They are virtually identical.

The "questionable" portion of the SW200 has been with some crown issues, due to their initial inexperience with casing (they were simply making the movements for ETA). This has been addressed and should be a non-factor soon. As far as reliablility, I own 5 SW200 movement timepieces and have had only 1 issue, which I believe was a rotor issue, not with the actual movement since it would run when hand wound, but not when placed on a winder. The SW200s are very accurate, in fact, the COSC Admiral I have for sale has the SW200 movement.

As more and more Invictas have the SW200 movement, I am sure you will see the stories of reliability (or lack thereof) develop.

Hope that helps!!!!
"it would run when hand wound", please educate me, the sw200 can be hand wound like a mechanical via the crown:confused1:, if so that would be fantastic, let me know. :001_smile:
 

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I am very new to the Invicta watch line. I wanted a nice watch with an automatic movement and did a lot of looking and reading. The one thing that became clear was that the Swiss ETA 2824-2 movement was by far the best value in any automatic movement with years of sales and lots of high end customers to verify the quality. In any grade, it seem to be a beast and any good repairman knows it and can get parts for it. Many watch companies build there reputaions on this movement. But the price of these watches were out of my buget. I like quality but also like a real value. Then I discovered the Invicta Swiss Automaics. After looking around, I bought a 99% like new first issue 9938 from a guy on e-Bay. I got it for $250.00 and was amazed at the quality. Heavy-Duty!!! I started looking for another Invicta Swiss to get for my birthday!

But, said to say, I have learned that the new Swiss Invictas now have a subjective nock-off of the ETA 2824-2. Why on Earth would the brains that brought this super-duper value of a watch sacrifice such an obvious gold mine of a nitch and risk there reputation on an unknown copy-movement for the same price as the original????

I have read about a lot of problems with this movement and have to question this move. Am I missing something, or does someone at Invicta need a wake-up call?
Cecil:

As was indicated, the Swatch Group (owner of ETA) has decided that they will only produce movements for brands underneath the Swatch Group umbrella. It was only the actions of the Swiss government that prevented them from doing so until, I believe, 2010. As it stands now, orders for movements can take a year or longer to be fulfilled.

The Sellita SW 200 movement that you mentioned is not really an "unknown knock off" of the ETA 2824-2. Sellita is a Swiss company and they have been around for some time now. Prior to the Swatch Group decision above, they were best known for taking ETA ebauche movements and some great customizations and decorations to them for other companies to use. Invicta has a great relationship with them. Invicta used them to do some of their customized/decorated movements. Invicta is also the first company that will be allowed to use Sellita's version of the ETA 7750 from what is being said. More and more companies are looking to Sellita for movements, but they are having to limit their access to previous customers.

As for myself, I have several watches with the Sellita SW 200 powering them. I have had no issues whatsoever with them. I do believe, however, that there were some early issues with the crown/stem of the movements. But, from what I can see, that has been corrected.

I would say that it might be beneficial to you to give the Sellita SW 200 the benefit of the doubt for a second. When it comes to Swiss ETA movements, you are going to see fewer and fewer of them in watches in the coming couple of years...unless the company using them happens to be under the ownership of Swatch.

Michael
 

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"it would run when hand wound", please educate me, the sw200 can be hand wound like a mechanical via the crown, if so that would be fantastic, let me know.
All of the SW200 based watches I own are capable of being wound via the crown.

Michael
 

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Very nice, do you wind on the crown till it stops, how does one know when to stop manually winding
I typically keep my autos on winder...however, if I left one off and want to wear it, I will typically give it 10 to 15 turns and then throw it on. That is more than enough to get it going and wearing it (movement) will do the rest.

Michael
 

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I typically keep my autos on winder...however, if I left one off and want to wear it, I will typically give it 10 to 15 turns and then throw it on. That is more than enough to get it going and wearing it (movement) will do the rest.

Michael
thanks Micheal, appreciate the information, on your sw200's , what's the average daily error your getting.

Richard..
 

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condor,

The modern automatics have a clutch so that they cannot be over-wound. Typically, 40-45 winds fully charge the watch and that is a good thing to do when you first get a new watch. After that, daily wear should keep it wound.
 

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condor,

The modern automatics have a clutch so that they cannot be over-wound. Typically, 40-45 winds fully charge the watch and that is a good thing to do when you first get a new watch. After that, daily wear should keep it wound.
learning everyday Rusty, thx
 
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