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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I loved it, too, especially since I just got a new Hamilton.

I'm glad someone responded to this thread, because I forgot whether or not I posted it, couldn't find here, and lost the link to the film.

I'm developing CRS. :blushing:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Thanks for sharing ...which Hammie you got?
This is my Hammie.





I haven't worn this watch as much as I would have liked or would have if I hadn't been fortunate enough to have acquired three new watches in about a month's span, including this one.

I love the looks of it. I love the history of the company, even if it has changed hands. I love the fact that it's Swiss. I love the long minute and second hands. And, the one thing that came as a surprise, I love the way it feels on my arm.

None of my watches are uncomfortable, but for some reason this one is the most comfortable of all.
 

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Cool looking piece..enjoy in good health ...I'm getting the Hamilton Aviation Auto. QNE (tan dial/brown strap)for X-mas, should be in my hands by mid next week....can't wait:)
 

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Funny thing Grady; when I opened the link I said to myself-
"20 minutes long? No way; I don't have the patients to watch this entire clip." Well, turns out I couldn't stop watching until the very end. This was an era in our country when CEO's cared about the pride of their product and the long term future of their company. Today, it's just about keeping the stockholders happy and lining the pockets of VP's and CEO's pockets with million dollar bonuses. :sad: Compare what you saw in this film to the way most modern movements are made today; not just the 7S26 Seiko movement, but what many don't know, is that 90% of most ETA mechanical movements without advanced complications are made on computerized CNC machines, minimally even touched by human hands except for final inspection. Things have certainly changed... :001_unsure:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
It is a fascinating film in many ways.

It's not exactly a cultural documentary, but it does tell us something about the change in American culture, industry, and values.

The scale of some of the watch parts is startling even today, but when you think of the advances in nanotechnology, the production process, taken out of the context of the era, seems amusingly primitive.

However, one thing that is impressive in any age and that is the purported investment of Hamilton in quality control at almost every stage of production, with some process being inspected multiple times.

Automation and CNC equipment have revolutionized manufacturing in so many positive ways, but no matter how perfect and reproducible the results, the importance of human oversight and judgement has never diminished one iota.
 

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Very cool film about a remarkable company, now (unfortunately) essentially gone.

It's interesting how, just two years after the end of WWII, they were pretty low key about the importance of their marine chronometers to our Navy during that war, and the remarkable advances they made in the production of such clocks. Of all my timepieces, my Hamilton Model 21 is one of my very favorite, and averages less than +1/4 second a day, despite apparently not having been serviced since 1968.
 
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