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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone ever tried to track down the person on the dedication on the back of your watch (I quite like watches with inscriptions...).

I have. Interesting! :wink:
 

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Has anyone ever tried to track down the person on the dedication on the back of your watch (I quite like watches with inscriptions...).

I have. Interesting! :wink:
Last year I bought an Accuquartz with an inscription on the case back. The watch was conferred to the President of Niagara University by the graduates in 1975, the year of his retirement. I looked him up on the web and found his obituary, which mentioned his retirement from Niagara. I now have a copy of the obit with the watch. Neat history!

I have a couple others that were presentation watches for years of service. Never looked up those folks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
When I see them on ebay you just think someone somewhere would really really like to have that because of some family connection or whatever. Maybe they don't have any connections anymore anywhere and that's why it's for sale. Scary. :scared:

I always feel a bit sad when someone is (supposedly) selling their fathers watch, grandfathers watch, etc, Unless you REALLY need $$$ that is sort of not what should be done IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
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Last year I bought an Accuquartz with an inscription on the case back. The watch was conferred to the President of Niagara University by the graduates in 1975, the year of his retirement. I looked him up on the web and found his obituary, which mentioned his retirement from Niagara. I now have a copy of the obit with the watch. Neat history!

I have a couple others that were presentation watches for years of service. Never looked up those folks.
I tell you about mine soon. i can't be bothered typing now. And I don't have the watch here. He got this lovely little Sea King as a prize for being the Bowler Of The Year in (i think) '71 in Mallad.
 

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I saw one on a militaria site where this guy had a watch, camera and pay book belonging to a German soldier his father had killed in WW2 in France. It was made even more sad by the guy posing next to this dead soldiers grave in a French war cemetery.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I saw one on a militaria site where this guy had a watch, camera and pay book belonging to a German soldier his father had killed in WW2 in France. It was made even more sad by the guy posing next to this dead soldiers grave in a French war cemetery.
Fscuk. That's full on.

I really wonder about the lives of the watches we buy from originl stamping and making to buying and all the rest of it. Fascinating.
 

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Some of the watches were shoved into the back of sock drawers, not to see the light of day for many years. They weren't worn and weren't remembered being seen on the wrists of loved ones. So, when the time comes, there is no real attachment for the family. In other cases the family members remaining just don't seem to care. Perhaps more true here in the U.S. than in some other countries. My wife inherited her Dad's 218 Accutron that was a "Years of Service" watch. Last year it went out to Bulgaria for service and was given to our Son as a Christmas gift. My original 218 Accutron will go to my Son and my wife's original 230 will go to out daughter. Both were serviced last year and are good-to-go. Last year I bought four 221s for my Daughter and three Grand Daughters. All were serviced. My Daughter got hers for Christmas and the oldest Grand Daughter got hers on her 14th birthday this Spring. The other two will get theirs when they turn 14. All are in period-correct boxes. Even though these watches were not new when given, they do understand their value and, hopefully, will be treasured as a gift from their Dad and Grand Dad. Also gave a nice serviced 219 to my Son-in-Law for Christmas. So, I am trying to spread the appreciation around to new generations for these fine watches and, hopefully, help tp cultivate interest in them into the future. I will probably gift a couple more to young folks I know who have an interest in watches.
 

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Some of the watches were shoved into the back of sock drawers, not to see the light of day for many years. They weren't worn and weren't remembered being seen on the wrists of loved ones. So, when the time comes, there is no real attachment for the family. In other cases the family members remaining just don't seem to care. Perhaps more true here in the U.S. than in some other countries. My wife inherited her Dad's 218 Accutron that was a "Years of Service" watch. Last year it went out to Bulgaria for service and was given to our Son as a Christmas gift. My original 218 Accutron will go to my Son and my wife's original 230 will go to out daughter. Both were serviced last year and are good-to-go. Last year I bought four 221s for my Daughter and three Grand Daughters. All were serviced. My Daughter got hers for Christmas and the oldest Grand Daughter got hers on her 14th birthday this Spring. The other two will get theirs when they turn 14. All are in period-correct boxes. Even though these watches were not new when given, they do understand their value and, hopefully, will be treasured as a gift from their Dad and Grand Dad. Also gave a nice serviced 219 to my Son-in-Law for Christmas. So, I am trying to spread the appreciation around to new generations for these fine watches and, hopefully, help tp cultivate interest in them into the future. I will probably gift a couple more to young folks I know who have an interest in watches.
Oliver,

I'm glad to hear that others are doing this. I too, have done this with several members of my family. Those in my generation have been given birth year 214's, my son and grandson will acquire my birth year favorite and my grandfathers spaceview. Until that time comes I have given my son one of the 214's I have acquired and when my grandson is older will give him one as a placeholder for the coveted spaceview. The rest of my collection will likely end up with my son or purged to help my grandson's education.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Some of the watches were shoved into the back of sock drawers, not to see the light of day for many years. They weren't worn and weren't remembered being seen on the wrists of loved ones. So, when the time comes, there is no real attachment for the family. In other cases the family members remaining just don't seem to care. Perhaps more true here in the U.S. than in some other countries. My wife inherited her Dad's 218 Accutron that was a "Years of Service" watch. Last year it went out to Bulgaria for service and was given to our Son as a Christmas gift. My original 218 Accutron will go to my Son and my wife's original 230 will go to out daughter. Both were serviced last year and are good-to-go. Last year I bought four 221s for my Daughter and three Grand Daughters. All were serviced. My Daughter got hers for Christmas and the oldest Grand Daughter got hers on her 14th birthday this Spring. The other two will get theirs when they turn 14. All are in period-correct boxes. Even though these watches were not new when given, they do understand their value and, hopefully, will be treasured as a gift from their Dad and Grand Dad. Also gave a nice serviced 219 to my Son-in-Law for Christmas. So, I am trying to spread the appreciation around to new generations for these fine watches and, hopefully, help tp cultivate interest in them into the future. I will probably gift a couple more to young folks I know who have an interest in watches.
Well done.

Mate, can you adopt me? I need another Accutron. :biggrin:
 
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