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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I do not recomend you do this and I am not a watch repair guy, infact I know about zero when it comes to watch repair. But the fact is my Invicta was running 20 seconds a day fast and was making me crazy. :cursing:

I check with the locals and they would not work on it because they don't sell Invicta or they wanted a lot to just adjust the thing. Being honest about things, I am an engineer and all that implies. I am also very handy with mechanical things, and math and stuff. Can not spell for crap, so sorry for that.

I did it. I took the back off and turned that little screw thing to the minus, one lines worth.

Now I'll see how much this slows this baby down and get back to you.

The o-ring looked good and seemed to grab at the end of tightening so the water lock should be okay for swimming and such. I don't deep sea dive.
Dang I hope it works out. :thumbup:

I will let you know.
 

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You're certainly braver than I am, but I would caution that I know of no company that will guarantee water resistance after a watch has been opened by anyone but the manufacturer.

I don't actually know whether the water resistance is affected by this, but apparently that is the issue, no one is willing to bet on it.

I have read on what seems to be a reputable site (I wish I could find it now) that it is folly to get any watch wet, unless you are a professional diver and get your watch regularly serviced and certified. His rationale is that unless the watch is regularly serviced you have no idea about the condition of the seals, so taking a watch in the water is an unnecessary risk.

For myself, I try to limit my test of water resistance to rain and splashes around the sink, regardless of what it says on the watch.

http://www.chronocentric.com/watches/wresist.shtml

"7. How often does water resistance need to be checked? At least once a year. Most manufacturers say water resistance needs to be tested every time the case back is opened, because opening the case can dislodge the gaskets. This rule applies even to a simple battery change. (Many service centers also change the gaskets whenever a watch comes in for service.) You should take it only to a service center authorized by the manufacturer. Doing otherwise could invalidate your warranty."

http://www.europastar.com/europastar/watch_tech/waterresistance.jsp
 

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Most watch places won't guarantee the W/R after a battery change but for a "nominal fee" they will replace the gasket and pressure test to assure the W/R.
My watches don't see much water so I don't bother.
 

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I do not recomend you do this and I am not a watch repair guy, infact I know about zero when it comes to watch repair. But the fact is my Invicta was running 20 seconds a day fast and was making me crazy. :cursing:

I check with the locals and they would not work on it because they don't sell Invicta or they wanted a lot to just adjust the thing. Being honest about things, I am an engineer and all that implies. I am also very handy with mechanical things, and math and stuff. Can not spell for crap, so sorry for that.

I did it. I took the back off and turned that little screw thing to the minus, one lines worth.

Now I'll see how much this slows this baby down and get back to you.

The o-ring looked good and seemed to grab at the end of tightening so the water lock should be okay for swimming and such. I don't deep sea dive.
Dang I hope it works out. :thumbup:

I will let you know.
I for one would not jump in the pool unless you don't mind taking a real big chance. There is only two ways to feel certain about water resistance. Send it back to the factory where they guarantee the work or, go to a reputable jeweler that has a pressure tank. Good luck on that one because few do!

The way the thing works is, they put your watch in the water tank and turn the pressure to the desired guaranteed depth. If there are no bubbles coming from the case, you are OK. Short of that, is just a chance.

IMHO, when you change a battery and are able to tell the gasket is still good and everything feels like it seats back OK, that means if you forget to take it off and you get it right out of the water, you may, only may be OK. Or, you may not!:blink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I don't get it. You break and reseal the crown all the time, so that seal would concern me more after seeing how the back is sealed. It has a big o-ring seal in a groove, that is mashed into the groove to make the seal. The crown has an o-ring around the stem that is not in compresson to aid in it's seal and you wear it out turning the stem. If you leave the crown just a little loose, there would be a much bigger chance of leaks than the compressed o-ring tightned down on the back???? No matter how many times you take the back on and off, you will still compress the o-ring on re-insall of the back, (check o-ring for damage with loop) not so with the crown. I think this is a myth to get your money at a service center. There is no warranty issue anyway, after 1 year, it expired already.
 

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Cecil,

After having been there and done that, I can tell you that one line is way too much. My advise is to only put the back on finger tight and don't wear the watch (keep it on a winder) for a couple of days as you will probably need to speed it up/slow it down a few times to get it just right. It only takes a very slight movement of the "adjuster" to change the speed by several seconds per day.
 

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I feel sure that you are right in assuming that you have a good seal. My wife and I have several Invicta's between us and one of hers leaked, but it was around the crystal. I have admittedly spent quite a bit of money with my watch maker, but he doesnt charge me for a quick regulation. I suggest you shop around.
 
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