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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So a good friend says...

I have this strange coin I would like to show you.

Check this out:







So what do we have here?
A Slight anomaly in the side of the coin...









Hummm?







It is thin!

















Original booklet;






Box:














Kinda cool, huh? Enjoy!:thumbup:

 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Guys!
I was hoping you all would like it...

It looks like it has sat undisturbed all these years.

It really is very cool to look at and
the watch and movement are both
beautiful under a loupe!

Glad you like it!

G
 

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So a good friend says...

I have this strange coin I would like to show you.

Check this out:




Kinda cool, huh? Enjoy!:thumbup:

"Kind of cool"? No, incredibly cool. Like, "Antiques Roadshow expert being floored when they see it" cool. That is an amazing piece, Greg. Is there anything you can share about it? Was the friend also the original owner?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
"Kind of cool"? No, incredibly cool. Like, "Antiques Roadshow expert being floored when they see it" cool. That is an amazing piece, Greg. Is there anything you can share about it? Was the friend also the original owner?
Thanks!
I was kinda floored when I saw it too.
She works for a coin dealer and she said they have
had it for years just locked up in the vault.
I will ask her more about the circumstances of it
getting into her shop. I really think they were
unsure about what it is and the particulars of the watch.

Dennis told me over the phone a little more,
maybe he can post here...
 

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I don't know about the coin part except to say they're a novelty. However, the movement inside the watch was part of Omega's thin line. The 70x were the manual versions; the 71x was the automatic series. It was a joint venture between Omega & Piguet in the mid/late 60's to put out an ultra-thin to compete with the other major manufacturers. Piaget first, and then AP/VC, had a few years of a jump on them in automatics at a time that thin was in. Omega released them in the very late 60's or very early 70's. Longines quickly followed suit with their 99x series of autos. I believe that these were like a few other Omega movements: the 70x was basically the 71x without the self-winding apparatus (just like the 55x auto / 60x manual relationship). If I'm wrong, hopefully gatorcpa, mondodec, CajunMike, or Cicindella will correct me.

Cool watch. :thumbup1:
 

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Dear Greg.
Adam asked that I post this research that he did on this watch.

Greg. I did a little research, of course 'Corum' is the most famous coin watch, but other also produced. Here below a little info for you.:

Omega, produced 1970's. 18ct gold gentleman's coin dress watch. I think limited to 300 pcs.
Case: Three-body, the hinged watch within the coin opening by a push piece concealed in the band
Face: Champagne or Satine silver with indexes and Arabic numerals. «Bâton» blued steel hands.
Movement: Cal.700, 17 jewels, straight line lever escapement, monometallic balance adjusted to 2 positions, self-compensating flat balance-spring.
Dial, case and movement signed. Diam. 35 mm.

Value $3000.

Acknowledgments Antiquorum."

Adam, asked I post this information.
Best
Ike
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks Adam!

Dear Greg.
Adam asked that I post this research that he did on this watch.

Greg. I did a little research, of course 'Corum' is the most famous coin watch, but other also produced. Here below a little info for you.:

Omega, produced 1970's. 18ct gold gentleman's coin dress watch. I think limited to 300 pcs.
Case: Three-body, the hinged watch within the coin opening by a push piece concealed in the band
Face: Champagne or Satine silver with indexes and Arabic numerals. «Bâton» blued steel hands.
Movement: Cal.700, 17 jewels, straight line lever escapement, monometallic balance adjusted to 2 positions, self-compensating flat balance-spring.
Dial, case and movement signed. Diam. 35 mm.

Value $3000.

Acknowledgments Antiquorum."

Adam, asked I post this information.
Best
Ike
Thanks Ike for passing on that wonderful horology.
Hope Adam is well and give him my best.

That coin still blows my mind!

G
 

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I don't know about the coin part except to say they're a novelty. However, the movement inside the watch was part of Omega's thin line. The 70x were the manual versions; the 71x was the automatic series. It was a joint venture between Omega & Piguet in the mid/late 60's to put out an ultra-thin to compete with the other major manufacturers. Piaget first, and then AP/VC, had a few years of a jump on them in automatics at a time that thin was in. Omega released them in the very late 60's or very early 70's. Longines quickly followed suit with their 99x series of autos. I believe that these were like a few other Omega movements: the 70x was basically the 71x without the self-winding apparatus (just like the 55x auto / 60x manual relationship). If I'm wrong, hopefully gatorcpa, mondodec, CajunMike, or Cicindella will correct me.

Cool watch. :thumbup1:
I think you've got it nailed pretty well, ULF.

Here's a different take on the same theme:



Movement is a manual-wind Jaeger-LeCoultre cal. P838.

Here's a Rolex Cellini version:



I think these all date from around 1970 or so.

I always wondered if one of the Swiss contract case makers did up a batch of these $20 gold pieces to standard movement specs and sold them to the various watch companies.

Very nice indeed!
gatorcpa
 
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