WATCH TALK FORUMS banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

· Super Moderator
Joined
·
17,361 Posts
With great difficulty (if you've never done this before)! I strongly urge you to take the watch to a place that sells and installs watch bands and bracelets.
Watch videos like this one to see what you're getting yourself into if you've never done this before, and you don't have the right tools.
using a watch link remover - Bing video
It's not a fun job. I've pierced my fingertip, bent and ruined pins, lost pins, scratched up my bracelet, and wound up with mediocre results. It CAN be done, but this is NOT a job you want to tackle for real without previous experience!
 

· Super Moderator
Joined
·
17,361 Posts
I was thinking that, but I had an early Seiko Kinetic that sported a bracelet quite similar to this one. I just wasn't sure.
Just looking at that bracelet is giving me a headache. LOL
 

· Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks everyone. I should have been more clear at the beginning, it is a Tag watch & bracelet. Look like I've gotta go buy some jeweler's screwdrivers. Been able to avoid that until now, but I guess it's time to bite the bullet.
 

· Super Moderator
Joined
·
17,361 Posts
If you live with machines, you gotta have the tools for upkeep and maintenance. It's either that or keep paying others to do the work for you.
May I suggest getting a GOOD set from a watchmaking tool supplier like Esslinger or J Borel. Cheaper screwdrivers (Harbor Freight Tools) have softer steels that will chip or bend out of shape.
 

· Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,846 Posts
You posted in the correct forum...the Tag Forum...so it wasn't a big leap to the Tag link bracelet. I have personnally never done an adjustment on this type of bracelet, but I have worked with both pin and collar and small screws. Screws are by far the easiest. You will need some tools and Esslinger is a source I have used quite often.
Wood Tool Electrical wiring Set tool Musical instrument accessory

I did not include a hammer, but any small hammer can be used. As you can see...a set of screw drivers, a watch bracelet holding block, a pin pusher vise to get the pin started, a good pair of non-magnetic tweezers for handling those small screws, small flat jaw plyers for pulling the pin out, and/or my preference a set of pin pushers to drive the pin out.
Make sure you have a clean well lit work surface. Some form of magnification may also be useful.
Take your time and good luck.
On the other hand, if you don't plan on doing this type of adjustments in the future you may be ahead to save your money and find a good jeweler/watch repair guy for this project.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top