WATCH TALK FORUMS banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The seller in this swamp listing 170728848412 states that not more than 250 of the rolled gold plate version were made. This watch seems to be rare, but not that rare. Does anyone know the actual production number for the rolled gold plate Coin?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
Coin Watch

I also remember reading a stat like that somewhere. I thought it was in René's book, but then I remembered I actually read it on his site when he had one of the 14k versions available. I like this watch. I was sad to see it make the "ugliest" list on another thread on this site.

Here is what René said about it on his site when he was offering one for sale:
"...HAMILTON "COIN WATCH". This is one of the most unusual aswell as one of the most historic of Hamilton watches. It was produced in 1969 just after all production of movements was shut down at Hamilton's Lancaster, PA factory in January 1969. Hamilton used the last remaining stocks of the superlative grade 770 movement with 22 jewels to complete this very interesting and rare watch. It was never cataloged and very few were made. It was produced in both rolled gold-plate, as this example, and in 14K solid gold. According to Paul Frankenfeld, a production manager at Hamilton at the time, only 50-75 were made in RGP, and 10-15 in 14K gold. However, based on my own experience, I believe these figures are too low. I think there were probably 150-250 in rolled gold-plate and 50-100 in gold, based on surviving examples. That still puts this watch among the very rarest of all Hamiltons ever made. The style is obviously copied after the Corum gold coin watches that were popular at the time. The dial is embossed to resemble a gold coin, and the edge of the case is reeded like a coin. It is very much a watch of its time -- a bit garish but certainly an eye-grabber! As a collectable it is one of the most sought-after of all Hamiltons because of its extreme rarity. This example is extra nice, with excellent rolled gold-plate case with no wear, and perfect original dial..." (quoted from rondeau.net).

The price seems about right based on others that have sold over the years. I remember that the big collector who no longer visits this site also had a couple for sale on his list at $500 and one at $1200 when the list fist came out.

I like it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
For what it's worth, a while back I had one of these.

I had the 770 movement, the coin dial, and a 14K back. Unfortunately, I didn't have the rest of the case.

I sold it for for what was probably a stupidly low price(a little more than the scrap value of the 14K back) not really knowing what it was.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,643 Posts
Here is what René said about it on his site when he was offering one for sale:
"...HAMILTON "COIN WATCH". This is one of the most unusual aswell as one of the most historic of Hamilton watches. It was produced in 1969 just after all production of movements was shut down at Hamilton's Lancaster, PA factory in January 1969. Hamilton used the last remaining stocks of the superlative grade 770 movement with 22 jewels to complete this very interesting and rare watch. It was never cataloged and very few were made. It was produced in both rolled gold-plate, as this example, and in 14K solid gold. According to Paul Frankenfeld, a production manager at Hamilton at the time, only 50-75 were made in RGP, and 10-15 in 14K gold. However, based on my own experience, I believe these figures are too low. I think there were probably 150-250 in rolled gold-plate and 50-100 in gold, based on surviving examples. That still puts this watch among the very rarest of all Hamiltons ever made. The style is obviously copied after the Corum gold coin watches that were popular at the time. The dial is embossed to resemble a gold coin, and the edge of the case is reeded like a coin. It is very much a watch of its time -- a bit garish but certainly an eye-grabber! As a collectable it is one of the most sought-after of all Hamiltons because of its extreme rarity. This example is extra nice, with excellent rolled gold-plate case with no wear, and perfect original dial..." (quoted from rondeau.net).

I like it.
I was the buyer for this watch and, as I've said before, I absolutely love it to bits. It's probably the one I would keep if I had to get rid of my collection. Why? Because of its rarity, because it was never catalogued, because it came from Rene, because it is the last US produced Hamilton, because it is a good size, because it has its original band and because it has Hamilton's (USA's???) best ever movement. Oh yeah - and because it looks fantastic on the wrist.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,613 Posts
What are the correct hands for this watch? I've seen a few with the wide blade style hands in black (as in the auction above). My example has these small, thin pointer style hands. I think the ones on mine are more appropriate for the busy design on the dial but which hands came with it from the factory?

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,643 Posts
What are the correct hands for this watch? I've seen a few with the wide blade style hands in black (as in the auction above). My example has these small, thin pointer style hands. I think the ones on mine are more appropriate for the busy design on the dial but which hands came with it from the factory?

Mine are the same as yours Dave - but I think that it came with these and the dauphin type shown in the auction.

I (happily) paid considerably more than the B.I.N. and thus think this is a bargain price.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
I was the buyer for this watch and, as I've said before, I absolutely love it to bits. It's probably the one I would keep if I had to get rid of my collection. Why? Because of its rarity, because it was never catalogued, because it came from Rene, because it is the last US produced Hamilton, because it is a good size, because it has its original band and because it has Hamilton's (USA's???) best ever movement. Oh yeah - and because it looks fantastic on the wrist.
What he said!

IMHO, the Hamilton Coin is one of the most under-appreciated Hamilton watches produced. I've owned 2 and have sold them to obtain some other popular Hamilton.

Coulda, woulda, shoulda kept them!

My intuition tells me that the Coin watch will eventually be appreciated for what it is - the last Hamilton watch to use a USA made 770 movement before the factory closed.
The RGP cases wear faster than any other RGP case so if a good example surfaces, go for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
Both styles

I've seen both styles of hands. The one in René's book looks to have the same style hands as the one in the auction. I've also seen some with and without a cabochon (a jewel on the crown). I used to think these differences existed between the solid gold and the RGP models, but I'm not sure that holds true.

I wonder if, as the factory was winding down US production, the used whatever parts were available.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,643 Posts
I'm putting out the hypothesis that the RGP version of the Coin had the "stick" hands and the solid gold version had the dauphin hands.

If anyone has any evidence to the contrary please let me know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
I'm putting out the hypothesis that the RGP version of the Coin had the "stick" hands and the solid gold version had the dauphin hands.

If anyone has any evidence to the contrary please let me know.
Well, my RGP Coin watch has the dauphin hands, and they appear to be original. The earlier stated idea that Hamilton was using up unused stock may be a good guess.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Gold Coin Watch

This is the Hamilton Gold Watch - my father purchased it in the early 70's. The original band deteriorated and he replaced it with a gold bar band. I have no idea what he paid for the watch or the gold wrist band. But, if you've never seen one, here it is. It has the rolled edge and has "14KT Hamilton" imprinted on the back. What is it worth? I have never had anyone quote me a price....but I have had many people say if I ever wanted to sell it to call them first <G> Information on the numbers produced and the real story seem to vary. Because it belonged to my father I have no intention of selling it. But, if you're curious ~ here is an example to look at. I could not get a better picture of the details because my camera will not focus on the metal ~ sorry.
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,641 Posts
For what it's worth (no pun intended)...one sold on eBay this past January. It was running and allegedly in very good condition.
The winning bid was $224.50
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,643 Posts
For what it's worth (no pun intended)...one sold on eBay this past January. It was running and allegedly in very good condition.
The winning bid was $224.50
An absolute screaming bargain and congratulations to the purchaser.

I paid $616 + postage for my solid gold example and $695 + postage for my 10K rolled gold example (with original leather band) from a famous Hamilton specialist on line. I have since swapped the band onto the 14K gold one. I was happy to pay both prices as this is one of the rarest Hamiltons and stunning on the wrist. I feel priviliged to own both, whatever the price.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,641 Posts
Thanks Roger, I'm sure frank is happy to read that! That Swamp sale did seem kinda lowball.

Just a gentle reminder for new members and lurkers.
WTF doesn't do appraisals, pre se. For one thing, we don't want to get ourselves in trouble if we say "the Hamilton Piping Rock is worth such and such an amount" but you get a considerably lesser amount when you try and sell yours. One of our quickest and easiest solutions, when this question does get asked, is to go to eBay and see what that watch (or similar watches) sold for. Or if I recently sold mine I'll tell you how much I got paid for it.

It's perfectly normal and OK to be curious about the value of a specific watch. It's part of the learning process and we're all here to help you learn. We'll do what we can to satisfy that curiosity. Just don't be surprised if our numbers sometimes disagree with that of professional experts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
14K Version of the Hamilton Liberty Coin Watch

I own one of the rare solid 14K Hamilton Liberty Coin watches, in pristine condition. I added a 14K solid gold signed Hamilton buckle to the black alligator strap. It is an incredible watch. I wear it every day.

My intuition tells me that the 14K gold versions of this watch came with Dauphine hands, and the 10K GF (RGP?) versions came with the baton hands.

It is a mystery to me why this ultra-rare 14K watch (probably the rarest of all Hamiltons as far as production numbers go) isn't valued like the Flight 1, Altair electric, etc.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,641 Posts
Actually, the rarest of the Hamiltons was the (solid 18k white gold w. 12 diamonds) Barbizon.
In the 1957 catalog, the list price was an astounding $2,200.oo
Only 2 watches are verified to have ever been sold.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top