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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
I inherited this Hamilton from my grandfather. It's engraved on the back with a 1963 date, but I can't find anything on-line that will verify that year or model. I think it's a "Brock", but I'm not sure. I recently had it serviced and refurbished, but they didn't indicate the movement and there isn't anything on the back of the case. Any information would be greatly appreciated - including lug size. It seems to measure 19mm. In addition, I would like to purchase a new band for it. The one that is currently on it (which I bought years ago) seems like it's a woman's band. It's a 'regular' 7.5" lizard band with six holes and has that vintage looking logo stamped onto the band. I don't think I have particularly large wrists, but I've got to use the second to last or last hole for it to fit, and I just want more band to go through the two loops on the buckle side. I'd like to use a genuine Hamilton band....any suggestions? Thanks again for any information.
Kevin
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Stafford is correct. This model was introduced in 1953 with a slightly different dial and was cataloged until 1962. This all numeral dial was the third version first cataloged in 1957. The 1962 catalog actually describes this particular dial as the "alternate full numeral dial". It is a solid 14k gold model with 14k gold numerals. The price in 1957 was $135 which was a considerable amount at the time. Oddly enough, by 1962, it was cataloged at only $125. Inside should be a 22 jewel Hamilton grade 770 which was perhaps the finest American manual watch movement ever made.

The Stafford was only available with a leather strap which is considered disposable, as you can well imagine. Finding a period correct Hamilton strap is like finding a needle in a stack of needles. The 19mm lug width corresponds with my previously collected data. If a 19R regular length is too short, it is best to pick your favorite style of leather strap in a 19L long.

You have a very nice and valuable watch (which is really priceless as a family heirloom). Wear it in good health.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you VERY much for that information. I really just wanted to know what I had so I could get parts if needed. I got brave and pulled it apart. VERY easy (like a lego, in fact), though you would have thought I was preparing for surgery. Inside was just what you indicated. A very, very clean (no doubt due to the restoration - not cheap, from what I might add) 770 movement. My guess is that it's a 1962, since it was engraved by Sylvania as a retirement gift in early 1963. As you indicate, it's priceless to me, and I will hand it down to one of my sons (the most watch crazed) one day. Two questions: How often should I wear it to keep things moving nicely and how many turns should I wind it? It's always been (I've had it more than 20 years, but only now sank $ into it) fairly easy to wind it all the way until it stops, which will run a day or so. Is that too much winding? I'd like to wear it just enough to keep it healthy, and keep my other pieces for every day. Thanks again. Kevin Dishware Serveware Wood Circle Jewellery
 

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Hi Kev,

most of the mods and lurkers here have a cupboard full of Hammys of various ages. What we do is wear them in rotation. I have about 30 watches (mostly hamilton but varies) that I wear regularly so they come up about once a month. I haven't any problems with wearing them this way. Mechanical watches (especially older ones) require maintenance on a regular basis (say every 3 - 5 years) this involves disassembly, cleaning, replacement of worn bits and reassembly with correct oiling and regulation. People who wore watches before the advent of Quartz accepted this as the normal state of affairs. Watches are also cheaper now than they were 40 years ago (pre-quartz). So you'd be happy to take your watch into the jeweller for a service (much like your car).

As for winding, this varies according to the size of the mainspring and how old it is (meaning how worn/stretched). Mainsprings are replacement parts (like crowns and crystals). You should wind it till it tightens up then stop. This should give you somewhere between 24 and 40 hours of power for the watch. Once a month should be fine if you're not wearing it in a rotation or only wearing it for special occasions. Get it cleaned up by good watch guy and wear it in remembrance of your Grandfather.

cheers,
 

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May I add my own congratulations on your inheritance?
BTW that dial is in lovely condition! :thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks everyone for your comments! I just got it back from a major service (its first in at least 30 years) at Tourneau (I believe a major certified vendor for Hamilton these days), and it was completely gone over (hammered out the hands, new crystal, movement service...everything). I've got a couple of other modern automatics (Ebel Type-e and a B&M) as well as a quartz Luminox (in case anyone gives a hoot) that I wear pretty much equally, so I wanted to know how to rotate an older piece in. Once or twice a month sounds just about right for what I was hoping - wear it occasionally in rememberance while keeping it in good shape for the next generation. Again, thanks all!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So, I've been looking on line, and some of the 770 movements have gold striping (like mine) and some do not. Is there a difference?

Man, this is addicting....I already see a few I want to add, like a masterpiece. The new field chrono-looking Hamilton looks nice, too. Also thinking about getting another 770 movement and putting it on ice, just to have. Oy.
 

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So, I've been looking on line, and some of the 770 movements have gold striping (like mine) and some do not. Is there a difference?
Kev: The striping is produced by the process of "damaskeening". To quote Wikipedia - and I draw your attention to the last paragraph:

"In horology, damaskeening is decorative patterning on a watch movement. The term damaskeening is used in America, while in Europe the terms used are Fausses Côtes, Côtes de Genève or Geneva Stripes. Such patterns are made from very fine scratches made by rose engine lathe using small disks, polishing wheels or ivory laps. These patterns look similar to the results of a spirograph or Guilloché engraving.

Damaskeening was first used in America around 1868-1869 by the U.S. Watch Co of Marrion and later spread to most other American watch manufacturers.

Two-tone damaskeening can be created by applying a thin plating of gold and then having the damaskeening scrape through the gold outer layer and into the nickel plate, or simply creating damaskeening on the gold layer. This creates patterns with two colors
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I looked at a few photos of 770s and agree that the two tone seems unusual. Good pickup - let's see what others say.

Man, this is addicting....I already see a few I want to add, like a masterpiece. The new field chrono-looking Hamilton looks nice, too. Also thinking about getting another 770 movement and putting it on ice, just to have. Oy.
Uhoh - another one teetering on the edge of the abyss. Same thoughts as the rest of had some 50 or 150 vintage watch arrivals ago! We need a 12-step program for this;

"Hi everyone, my name is Kev and I'm a watcholic".

(Everyone) "Hi Kev, welcome".
 
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