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Hi I had this watch from my grandfather and i think its a quite old and rare cause he loved watches..can u please help me on ID, age and value? I think it's from about 1930 or something like that..

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Welcome! Yes, it's a 13ZN. If the serial number is 8,098,109 it's from 1950 and if it's 6,018,608 it's from 1940 (depends on which way you look at your picture). That watch, even in it's current state, is worth several thousand dollars. Don't use it without having it serviced so you don't break anything inside due to dirt and lack of lubrication.

Awesome heirloom! :thumbup1:
 

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thks.. i need a special watchmaker or a good one is enough to restore it? in your opinion can i do something with the patina on the dial or its better i leave in that way?
 

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You want to send it to an authorized Longines designated or a major Swiss watch service center. There are several of these located throughout the North America, Europe, Asia, Central America, South America, Africa, Australia, etc. Go to the Longines.com official website homepage. At the bottom right-hand corner of the page is a "Customer Services" link. Clicking on that will allow you to choose your region of the world. Once you do that, you will be shown a list of authorized by Longines service centers. I think the one listed for the United States is located in New Jersey.

Here is the link to another company - located near Chicago - I use to repair and service all my Longines watches. My experience with this company has been most satisfying, as well as professional, courteous, and being the most convenient when it comes to communication. They have an excellent website with easy to follow instructions and forms. They have a "Watch Repair Inquiries" email form you simply fill it out and send it to them over the web and they will email you back, usually the next day. Plus, their telephone number is prominently displayed at the top of the page...and if you call it, you will actually be talking to a human office person!

This way, you exclude the middleman because usually -- with a watch like this -- all a local jeweler is going to do is send it to a similar place and then get his cut, above what the service center is charging to repair it. With a watch like this, I wouldn't want some curious amateur attempting to "repair" it. It may cost you several hundred to a thousand dollars to get it where it should be, but that is preferable to someone ruining it then telling you, "It can't be fixed."
 

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thks.. i need a special watchmaker or a good one is enough to restore it? in your opinion can i do something with the patina on the dial or its better i leave in that way?
Well, that one is up to you. Most collectors prize originality and prefer having the patina over having a refinished dial. But if you intend to keep and wear the watch you may prefer to have it cleaned and restored.
 
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