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Discussion Starter #1
A buddy of mine is forwarding this watch to me for evaluation. I have never seen one quite like this. Both the subdial and the red and white hand are both running second hands. They don't line up with each other, and there doesn't seem to be a way to stop or reset either of them. The watch does hack. My friend is up there in years and can't get the back open. I won't know the movement until I receive the watch.







Anyone one know what it is or why there are two second hands?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It may be a railroad style pocket watch and I'll venture a guess that the OTHER second hand in actually for a second time zone.
I thought that as well. The owner insists they are both moving as second hands. If you look at the first two pictures the hands in both pictures are 14 seconds apart.
 

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OK since we are taking "stabs" here's mine.....I think that the two second hands are running at the same pace and one was removed and put back on 14 seconds faster or slower whichever hand you wish to address..My guess the reason for the BIG second hand is to make it more visual.....the smaller second hand is the standard. So maybe the sales point to this watch was a large second hand readout?????:blink::confused1::glare::001_unsure:
 

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I gotta go with the second time zone.
I don't know how or why a central and sub seconds hand could be possible.
There are 4 hand Ball pocket watches that have a second timezone denoted by a fourth hand.
 

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I gotta go with the second time zone.
I don't know how or why a central and sub seconds hand could be possible.
There are 4 hand Ball pocket watches that have a second timezone denoted by a fourth hand.
I agree, but he said it is running at the same pace of the small second hand????:confused1::confused1::confused1:
 

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As near as I can tell, this is a chronograph. Perhaps the stem is broken and does not work properly.
I'm thinking that when working in a proper fashion, when you push the crown down the chronograph sweep hand starts right up. When you push the crown again the sweep hand stops, and a third time the sweep hand should return exactly back to 12 pm sharp.
 

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You may be correct, Gerry. Thanks. Pretty unusual for a pocket watch wouldn't you say?
Actually not that unusual. Chronograph pocket watches started appearing in the early 1800's.
To find one that is pristine is quite unusual. Most (or should I say all?) of these have been refurbished.
I dare say that this is most desireable to have on this watch, as it will fetch a little more money than usual.
If you search the internet, you will find quite a few professionals that specialize in bringing these beauties back to life.
 

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This is not the watch in question, but it is so far the only example of a pocket watch chronograph that I have found so far.



Product Description
Chrome plated base metal screw back case (51mm diameter/16S) with U.S. military markings, signed black dial with white painted numerals (original, very crsip), two registers: constant seconds and 30 minute recorder, white hands, chronograph sweep. 19 jewel signed manual wind chronograph [movement] (model 23, adjusted to temperature and 3 positions with fine swan's neck regulation). Very clean Hamilton "Model 23" chronograph, U.S. Military issued, circa 1950.
 

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I have an old Elgin pocket watch that was my great grandfathers that need hands and a crystal and likely a going through...

Does anyone know where/who I could send it to for refurbishing...it has sentimental value...and when I dated it it came from the 1880's I think.
 

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I have an old Elgin pocket watch that was my great grandfathers that need hands and a crystal and likely a going through...

Does anyone know where/who I could send it to for refurbishing...it has sentimental value...and when I dated it it came from the 1880's I think.
You can try checking this address for someone who MAY be able to assist you.
www.watch-clock-makers.org

Be very careful since some companies may claim to be able to do repair and refurbishing but send your watch out to someone else and charge you a markup for just being a middle man.
 

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I have an old Elgin pocket watch that was my great grandfathers that need hands and a crystal and likely a going through...

Does anyone know where/who I could send it to for refurbishing...it has sentimental value...and when I dated it it came from the 1880's I think.
I am sending you a PM.

Regards,

Gérard M. Diffiné
SARO-Gem US, Inc.
&
Montres Edouard Lauzières - North America
 

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Chronograph pocket watch

This is not the watch in question, but it is so far the only example of a pocket watch chronograph that I have found so far.

GradyPhilpott;

If you search eBay, quite a few come up. And they fetch a good price.
Normally these are refurbished and sold by collectors to collectors.

Some of the pocket watch websites will reveal quite a few very nicely refurbished chronograph pocket watches.

I myself do not own one, but would not mind doing so. :)

Regards,

Gérard M. Diffiné
SARO-Gem US, Inc.
&
Montres Edouard Lauzières - North America
 

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Discussion Starter #18
As near as I can tell, this is a chronograph. Perhaps the stem is broken and does not work properly.
I'm thinking that when working in a proper fashion, when you push the crown down the chronograph sweep hand starts right up. When you push the crown again the sweep hand stops, and a third time the sweep hand should return exactly back to 12 pm sharp.
This was my thought as well. Although the owner states that the crown works just like any other watch, "in" it winds, "out" it sets, and it doesn't appear to be able to be "pushed in".

If we assume "it is what it is", what should be done with it? Clearly fix it so it functions, but is he better off to "refurbish" (replace cracked crystal) or completely "refinish" it, with new or repainted dial, hands etc.?

Notice if you look real close, the dial has 13-24 hour markings inside the 1-12 markings.

Who is qualified to work on this (assuming it is a chronograph)?

Thanks,
Dave
 

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Chronograph Pocket Watch

This was my thought as well. Although the owner states that the crown works just like any other watch, "in" it winds, "out" it sets, and it doesn't appear to be able to be "pushed in".

If we assume "it is what it is", what should be done with it? Clearly fix it so it functions, but is he better off to "refurbish" (replace cracked crystal) or completely "refinish" it, with new or repainted dial, hands etc.?

Notice if you look real close, the dial has 13-24 hour markings inside the 1-12 markings.

Who is qualified to work on this (assuming it is a chronograph)?

Thanks,
Dave
Perhaps the chronograph portion that the stem resets is broken, but the time reset still works.

I have a very small collection of pocket watches that in all honesty, I would rather keep in the condition that they are in now. Original. With the exception of a Gruen Verythin that someday I will get around to getting refurbished.

So, I don't have much experience in the area of recommending anyone, as I have no personal experience of having any pocket watches refurbished myself.

I would think that if due diligence is performed in finding the true worth of this watch "as is", and having someone locally take a good look at this watch, it can then be determined whether it is worth being fixed, and at what cost.

It is tough to gauge by a picture, but this looks like it is in good condition, and may be worth the money spent to get this in perfect working condition.

Regards,

Gérard M. Diffiné
SARO-Gem US, Inc.
&
Montres Edouard Lauzières - North America
 
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