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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The 1960s saw the race towards the development of the first automatic chronograph of the world. Two groups were in contention for this feat. The group of Movado/ Zenith versus Heuer/ Breitling/ Hamilton/ Dubois Depraz. Both groups achieved their aims independently, at about the same time and exhibited their new developments at the Basel Fair in 1969. Both claimed to be the first to introduce the first automatic chronograph of the world. However, the caliber 11 by the group of Heuer/ Breitling/ Hamilton/ Dubois Depraz would beat the Movado/ Zenith team by over a month!


By 1968, the group had carried out the first conclusive tests and developed experimental prototypes. The winding-mechanism and the caliber 11 chronograph, the "chronomatic" measuring 13 ¾ lines (31 mm in diameter) and 7.7 mm in height, worked marvelously well, even under extreme conditions, with an accuracy close to the norms required of a chronometer. Officially on March 3rd 1969, after 500,000 Swiss francs spend, the world first automatic chronograph was unveiled, over a month before Basel fair 1969 where the El Primero was introduced.

Named the "Chronomatic", the movement was used in the few houses under different models. With Heuer, it is used in "Monaco", "Carrera" and the "Autavia". "Chronomatic" under Breitling and Hamiliton.

Text courtesy of ATG Vintage Watches...

My hamilton Crono-matic Pride and Joy -











Other watches using the same movement during the period.....These are not my watches or pictures....

Breitling



Tag Monaco

 

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March 3, 1969.

I had no idea that the analog chrongraph was so young.

I think I must have been in Japan on that day. I was in a world of hurt.

From the first time I ever laid eyes on one, I was in love.

It would be many years before they would become as affordable as they are today.

And I notice that the tachymeter was not a feature of the first ones.
 

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Dodger blue, there must be a story surrounding how that Fountainebleau came to be in your possession?:eek:hmy:
 

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Oh! It's the first AUTO chronograph. That's a big difference, but still a significant event. :blush:
 

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Good stuff mgiraz. Speaking of Dodgers I fondly remeber the infield of my youth: Garvey, Lopes, Cey, Russell, and Scioscia.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Good stuff mgiraz. Speaking of Dodgers I fondly remeber the infield of my youth: Garvey, Lopes, Cey, Russell, and Scioscia.
Boy that ages me....The infield of my youth was Gilliam, Wills, Trazewski, and Skowron!
 

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Boy that ages me....The infield of my youth was Gilliam, Wills, Trazewski, and Skowron!
OT, but the Dodger infield of my youth was Gilliam, Reese, Robinson (as in Jackie), and Hodges with Campanella behind the plate. And while I am at it, the outfield was Amoros, Snider, and Furillo. With Podres, Newcomb et al pitching they were good enough to win the World Series in '55.:thumbup1:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
OT, but the Dodger infield of my youth was Gilliam, Reese, Robinson (as in Jackie), and Hodges with Campanella behind the plate. And while I am at it, the outfield was Amoros, Snider, and Furillo. With Podres, Newcomb et al pitching they were good enough to win the World Series in '55.:thumbup1:

And 2 years later they were gone....I saw a historical on this and it wasn't O'Malley but a NY city planner that chased the Dodgers to the West coast. He wouldn't let the O'Malleys build a stadium where he wanted.:wink:
 
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