WATCH TALK FORUMS banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My initial question was going to be what is the value of a Winslow?

I need to thin out some watches and raise some money for new purchases, and one of the watches that may leave my collection is a Winslow and I have no idea how to price it. That lead me to the question... Is scarce valuable? The Winslow was a 1-year-only model, and the production numbers are quite low. Does that inherently make the watch valuable? I wouldn't think so, but I can't be sure.

Any thoughts of value versus rarity? Or suggestions on the value for a petite Winslow?

Thanks,
Chris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Valuable?

Hello cj...EVERYTHING is valuable to someone..The trick is to find THAT particular person...I would start by searching Ebay & google for your exact watch..This may help you determine it's worth...If it is indeed valuable then Ebay will probably give you your best exposure to potential buyers...There's never been a bigger market for vintage watches so you've probably got a good chance of flipping it...Hope this helps a little..Good luck...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,958 Posts
Scarce does not necesssarily equal valuable. It depends on the desirablility of the model. I had a 1950's Sheldon several years ago and flipped it to fund another purchase. I bought it for $99 and sold it for $130 and have since only seen two others that sold for $80 & $48. The reason the Winslow model was only in the catalog for one year is that it didn't sell very well since it was perceived (and still is) as too feminine by men because of the cord band. I've only got nine prices recorded, which IMO makes it a scarce model, but the average selling price is only $121. So, not valuable to collectors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,448 Posts
To use a car analogy, a Ugo is scarce in the USA, yet they are not valuable, at least to a large number of the population. But there might be someone out there willing to pay top dollar for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,640 Posts
I think one thing that makes the Winslow (and a similar Elgin model called the Sportswatch) not-so-desirable, despite their uniqueness and scarcity, is that they are just too different from what any guy of today will wear. And that's too bad, because these watches are cool in their own way. They come from an era where the rules of "What A Man's Watch Is' were still being settled, and they're like one of those evolutionary dead ends.

But it's tough enough to wear the little tonneaus from the 30s and 40s, let alone a little round watch on what looks like a ladies' cord band!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,958 Posts
I never really thought about it, but they could have been target marketing. I'm sure there were flamboyant men in the 30's that would have worn it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,643 Posts
Does scarce mean valuable?

No.

And the converse is also not true; ie valuable does not mean scarce.

There are MANY scarce Hamiltons - my favourite example is the Dunham and several others have been mentioned here; a zillion to choose from in the late 40s, the 50s and 60s. One or two year models, rarely seen for sale - and unless something weird is going on - not selling for much over $100.

And for the converse - I think the examples used here previously in relation to this question are Pacers and Piping Rocks. ALWAYS available in the market so certainly not scarce but always returning high values. Over the past two years the increase in gold price has dragged the intrinsic value of PRs and solid gold Pacers upwards but perhaps the key factor is that these are attractive watches and therefore collectable.

An interesting question would be, "What vintage Hamilton watches are valuable and why?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,689 Posts
Does scarce mean valuable?

No.

And the converse is also not true; ie valuable does not mean scarce.

There are MANY scarce Hamiltons - my favourite example is the Dunham and several others have been mentioned here; a zillion to choose from in the late 40s, the 50s and 60s. One or two year models, rarely seen for sale - and unless something weird is going on - not selling for much over $100.

And for the converse - I think the examples used here previously in relation to this question are Pacers and Piping Rocks. ALWAYS available in the market so certainly not scarce but always returning high values. Over the past two years the increase in gold price has dragged the intrinsic value of PRs and solid gold Pacers upwards but perhaps the key factor is that these are attractive watches and therefore collectable.

An interesting question would be, "What vintage Hamilton watches are valuable and why?

I agree with you Roger -- Piping Rocks and Pacers are great examples of relatively easy to find watches that retain their high values. I would throw the Ventura into that mix also. But as an example of TRUE rarity, last year a uber-rare 1928 Yankee Piping Rock that had been the gift to Lou Gehrig after the Yankees World Series victory. This INCREDIBLY rare and desirable watch sold for 6 figures at Heritage Auctions. Now THAT is scarce and valuable! Somewhere out there is a similar watch engraved to Babe Ruth... if and when it ever comes to auction, one can only imagine that it will likely sell for even more.

EDIT: SORRY, corrected obvious typo... this is Gehrig's watch, Joe came much later. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
494 Posts
I agree with you Roger -- Piping Rocks and Pacers are great examples of relatively easy to find watches that retain their high values. I would throw the Ventura into that mix also. But as an example of TRUE rarity, last year a uber-rare 1928 Yankee Piping Rock that had been the gift to Joe DiMaggio after the Yankees World Series victory. This INCREDIBLY rare and desirable watch sold for 6 figures at Heritage Auctions. Now THAT is scarce and valuable! Somewhere out there is a similar watch engraved to Babe Ruth... if and when it ever comes to auction, one can only imagine that it will likely sell for even more.
Rick - Are you referring to Lou Gehrig's Piping Rock? Oddly, we know of only about 5 of the 32 distributed 1928 Yankee Piping Rocks and two of those are owned by the Hall of Fame. When you look at the names of the players who received those watches, Gehrig, Ruth, Dickey, Hoyt, Pennock, Lazzeri, they represent some of the greatest players ever to have taken a baseball field. Ruth's version would be valuable and so would the others (we know where Gehrig's and Hoyt's watches are located). I could easily believe (based on nothing except his personality), that Ruth gave his to some one night stand, who hocked it for the cash. If you ever see one of these watches in person, you will notice that the reverse is engraved nicely, but the player name (on the lip of the watch) is extremely hard to read.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,689 Posts
Rick - Are you referring to Lou Gehrig's Piping Rock? Oddly, we know of only about 5 of the 32 distributed 1928 Yankee Piping Rocks and two of those are owned by the Hall of Fame. When you look at the names of the players who received those watches, Gehrig, Ruth, Dickey, Hoyt, Pennock, Lazzeri, they represent some of the greatest players ever to have taken a baseball field. Ruth's version would be valuable and so would the others (we know where Gehrig's and Hoyt's watches are located). I could easily believe (based on nothing except his personality), that Ruth gave his to some one night stand, who hocked it for the cash. If you ever see one of these watches in person, you will notice that the reverse is engraved nicely, but the player name (on the lip of the watch) is extremely hard to read.
LOL, I just realized my typo... SORRY, yes, it was Gehrig's PR. Actually, Will has stated (and shown) that he owns Pat Collins' PR (the Yankees catcher) so that is one more. Rene has said before that the Babe's PR came to Hamilton for service from a family member in the 60s... so it likely resides in some baseball collection somewhere. I bet Gehrig's PR results will bring a few more out into the light of day. Too fun!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
494 Posts
LOL, I just realized my typo... SORRY, yes, it was Gehrig's PR. Actually, Will has stated (and shown) that he owns Pat Collins' PR (the Yankees catcher) so that is one more. Rene has said before that the Babe's PR came to Hamilton for service from a family member in the 60s... so it likely resides in some baseball collection somewhere. I bet Gehrig's PR results will bring a few more out into the light of day. Too fun!!
Hoyt's is in the Hall of Fame. Not sure which other one is in the Hall of Fame, though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Excelent Thread

Thanks for the info... it's as I suspected... scarce doesn't indicate value. Other examples come to mind where the rarity and value don't always go hand in hand. The Liberty Coin Watch on the mechanical side, and the see-through Electric Clearview on the electric side should be selling for much more (more than Piping Rocks and Venturas) if scarcity was the only determining factor of value.

To me, the other interesting pricing element has always centered around personalizations. Some collectors like a pristine case back, while others really enjoy a great birthday, wedding, Christmas, or graduation personalization engraved on the case back. I tend to favor non-personalized backs.

So... based on the comments above, I think I'll post my Winslow in a week or two and for those interested, I'm willing to let it go for less and Gehrig's Piping Rock. And it doesn't even have any personalization like Gehrig's does. :001_smile::001_smile::001_smile:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,640 Posts
An interesting question would be, "What vintage Hamilton watches are valuable and why?
Not just Hamilton watches. I think the psychology of what is and isn't desireable to collectors is fascinating. With vintage watches, I think I'm safe in saying that many collectors are, like me, Baby Boomers, so we're now in our 50s and 60s, and what we find desireable are watches that have some tie to our memories and youth. Also, perceptions of quality and desireability that we learned then stay with us. I used to think that we wanted the things we saw our parents wearing, or driving, etc. But I think what we REALLY want are the things our parents wanted.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top