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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
At what point do you decide a time piece is no longer worth the investment to bring it back to life? Is this again a personal and passionate choice or is there a set of criteria that is generally accepted for guidelines?

I have a Tag. Not sure what model, all it has on the dial is "Professional". I have owned this watch since new. Just after Costco opened in my local area (north greater Toronto area) 20 years ago, they carried the Tag Heuer line. I purchased one from them. This watch, aside of the occasional service and battery replacement has not been off my wrist.

Now, however, after such enduring use, the watch is in need of some serious attention. It still keeps accurate time. Though I still have the original, I wore through the bracelet. The crystal is breaking down around the outer edge on the inside. It requires a serious cleaning, lubing and new gaskets/seals. Also, the crown is in need of replacing. The watch has been sent to the authorized service provider to get an estimate of cost of repairs to restore. The estimate cost came back at $600.00 more than I paid for the watch originally, right around the retail price at the time, and is the same cost I purchased my new for. Restoration costs are $1400.00.

Aside of the sentimental value, 20 years of use and it owes me nothing now, I sense this may be throwing good money after bad. Any thoughts or opinions?
 

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First, call Jesse and see what he says. He's as good and way cheaper than factory prices. Shoot him a PM (he's member omega564) and go from there. You're newer than when this thread was posted:

http://www.watchtalkforums.info/forums/general-discussion-forum/54624.htm

That's a good example of why several of us use him. I don't know what you mean by "wore through the bracelet". Are you saying it was plated and now the base metal is showing? If so, that's a problem. If it's solid stainless than it can be restored.

Second, if it has sentimental value that outweighs monetary value. If it doesn't and it's a financial decision, then a quartz watch is usually not worth restoring. Only the very rare, like an Omega Marine Chronometer or Rolex Day/Date Oysterquartz, are viable candidates for profitable refurbishing and only if done correctly with original parts.

Third, many of us started into nice watches with TAG. :thumbup1:
 

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IMHO, at $1400, you're really into a sweet spot in the new market, and a helluva place grey-market or used.

I, myself, couldn't see spending that money/time to repair, instead of replace/upgrade, unless the watch had terrific sentimental value
 

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I will echo Dennis' recommendation to speak with Jesse. He has worked on several of my pieces including two extremely rare watches that I wouldn't trust other people with, and currently has a third that only one person knows about.

What I would do is get a new piece, at the price range for restoration, you can get yourself a new watch, and find someone that'll work on the piece for 1/5th of the price. Then you can have it for memories and pass to an offspring or just keep and then rotate the two so rather than lasting 20 years, the two watches will last 40!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the responses. I would really like to get the old Tag restored and have it for a hand me down but at $1400.00 that's difficult choice seeing what I see in here and the many options that I had never considered.

I will contact Jesse and see what can be done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
First, call Jesse and see what he says. He's as good and way cheaper than factory prices. Shoot him a PM (he's member omega564) and go from there. You're newer than when this thread was posted:

http://www.watchtalkforums.info/forums/general-discussion-forum/54624.htm

That's a good example of why several of us use him. I don't know what you mean by "wore through the bracelet". Are you saying it was plated and now the base metal is showing? If so, that's a problem. If it's solid stainless than it can be restored.

Second, if it has sentimental value that outweighs monetary value. If it doesn't and it's a financial decision, then a quartz watch is usually not worth restoring. Only the very rare, like an Omega Marine Chronometer or Rolex Day/Date Oysterquartz, are viable candidates for profitable refurbishing and only if done correctly with original parts.

Third, many of us started into nice watches with TAG. :thumbup1:
The bracelet is stainless and gold plated but I wore through a few of the connecting links as well as wore the plating off. The plating I'm not too concerned about for a hand me down situation since the watch is 20 years old and very well worn...a sign of treasured use in my eyes. Character and patina so to speak.

Your comment of "Third, many of us started into nice watches with TAG."...is this to suggest that Tag is on the lower end of the high end watch spectrum or the higher end of the mid range spectrum?

...lamments so much to learn and discover and so many pit falls along the way...an adventure non the less...
 

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I'd say higher mid when running the gamut of what watches are and can be, but to the common person TAG is high end I'm sure.

I rank them on par with Breitling and Omega (modern).
 

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To expound on what Jeff (Valtyr) has said, TAG is a brand that advertises quite a bit so the general public knows their name quite well. Those who aren't into watches think Rolex is the best watch in the world and TAG is the next step under them. I wouldn't call them low end; I'd say they're more of a lower-middle tier watch.

Scott D had a thread about his 20-some year old TAG losing it's plating on the bracelet too. It would be interesting to find out how much it would cost to have the links replated, or if the rest of the plating could be take off to make it all stainless.
 

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If it's a quartz movement, I imagine that Jesse would likely simply replace the entire movement for FAR less than the factory service quoted for repair -- though in reality they will just replace the entire movement also. His repair costs will be far less also. I hate to say this, but to me a quartz watch, unless it has SERIOUS sentimental value, is not worth spending much repairing... unless perhaps it is a Patek and you are repairing it to sell. Somewhere I have an old 2-tone TAG quartz also (though I hate to admit it), and I would not even think of repairing it. (If I had thought of this, I'd know for sure where it is... :lol:)
 
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