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". . . It was during this time (1966-69) that Hamilton started to incorporate the highly innovative Buren Microtor (aka Micro Rotor/Microrotor) movement into certain upper tier watches (in addition to their ordinary hand-wind and traditional automatic watches).

The Buren (now Hamilton/Buren) Microtor was the disputed first automatic wristwatch movement to eliminate the sizable external oscillating weight inherent to most automatic winding watches. Instead, it utilized a much smaller weight that was entirely integrated into the chassis of the movement. This design allowed for a substantially slimmer automatic watch that still retained a center sweep second hand. The Microtor concept was also conceived by Universal Geneve for use in their famous Polerouter series of timepieces. The official title of "first Microtor movement" is still in dispute, in spite of remarkable similarities that exist between the Universal and Buren designs."




Source: Answers.com
 

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Actually, Hamilton started using Buren micro-rotor movements in their "Thin-O-Matic" series in 1959.

As a watchmaker, I really don't like those movements..... In order to make a super-thin automatic the designers were obliged to make the rotor very small and much lighter in weight than conventional 'full' rotors. As a result it is very inefficient in transferring wrist motion to wind the mainspring. Unless you're extremely active it's hard to get enough motion to keep the watch fully wound by the automatic feature. The manner in which the rotor mounts to the shaft was poorly thought out and easily broken. All in all, Thin-O-Matics can often be something of a nightmare to work on.
 

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As long as I'm offering my opinions on vintage movements, let me add that from a watchmaker's perspective the finest Hamilton wristwatch movement ever made was the 770. It was literally the culmination of 60 years of continued evolution and development. Supremely well made, with 22 jewels. it's an extremely accurate mechanical movement and an absolute joy to work on. They thought of everything from the watchmaker's perspective, unlike early movements like the 979. It practically falls together on its own....
 

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It was made from 1955 to 1969 and used in a lot of different styles, but there are no published records that list all of them. It's a windup so that obviously excludes automatics but a great many of the better watches of the 1960s had it. Perhaps the most notable are the Flight I and Flight II.
 

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770 Models

To add my two cents worth, I see from my own collection that some models with the 770 movement Ren茅 praised in addition to the 1960 Flight II are the 1953 Viscount, the 1955 Halesworth B, the 1955 Malcolm, the 1959 Thor, and the 1962 Lord Lancaster C (diamond dial Blade).

Hey, Ren茅...maybe you could add an appendix to the next edition of your book that lists the movements for each model?

Best,
Brian
 
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