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Discussion Starter #1
So I was all excited to use the tip of getting rid of the glare/reflections on the watch crystal with my circular polarizer, but alas I am forlorn... :sad: Pardon the poor quality pics, but this was just a quick test.

Here is a shot with no polarization. The shot is taken pretty much straight on, but you can see the reflection on the black mirrored finish that its sitting on.


Here now is a shot where I intentionally created a glare on the dial and then used the polarizer. All it did was to remove the reflection of the watch from the surface it was sitting on. I tried it at different angles and it still seemed to have zero effect on the watch dial. Am I missing something?
 

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Well, you missed setting the hands to the proper time... :lol:

Sorry...Rigano gets me every time I post a photo with improperly set hands....couldn't resist.

In any event, I've never seen a polarizer used with satisfactory results.
 

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Well, the polarizer is going to effect the two different planes seperately. As you bring out the dial (perpendicular plane) detail and lessen that reflection, you're decreasing the polarization of the surface (the flat plane), which results in an increased level of reflection and glare.

That's my story and I'm stickin' to it.

What are you using as a reflective surface under the watch?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well, the polarizer is going to effect the two different planes seperately. As you bring out the dial (perpendicular plane) detail and lessen that reflection, you're decreasing the polarization of the surface (the flat plane), which results in an increased level of reflection and glare.

That's my story and I'm stickin' to it.

What are you using as a reflective surface under the watch?
Ok, so given that law of physics, how do I get it to work on the watch and not the black mirrored plastic its sitting on? :confused1: No matter which way I rotated it the watch dial stayed the same.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well, you missed setting the hands to the proper time... :lol:

Sorry...Rigano gets me every time I post a photo with improperly set hands....couldn't resist.

In any event, I've never seen a polarizer used with satisfactory results.
Thanks for the subtle pick up. :001_smile: Notice that I didn't point out that in the pic of my sub and your SD that the second hands are a little off?? See, I'm getting nicer. :001_tt2:
 

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Ok, so given that law of physics, how do I get it to work on the watch and not the black mirrored plastic its sitting on? :confused1: No matter which way I rotated it the watch dial stayed the same.
I think you can possibly get the result you want if you also polarize the light source - polarized plastic sheets used to be available for mounting on the front of strobes (I don't know about hot lights, though). However, polarizers are not magic and they will not affect reflection from a polished metal surface.
There was an excellent polarization article in Popular Photography magazine in September, 2002, including details about cross-polarization. It is available at the magazine's website. or just Google for it online...
 

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Ok, so given that law of physics, how do I get it to work on the watch and not the black mirrored plastic its sitting on? :confused1: No matter which way I rotated it the watch dial stayed the same.
I'm not sure I understand.

In the photos you posted, one has heavy glare on the dial, and very little reflection on the surface. In the other, there's very little glare on the dial, but heavy reflection on the surface.

Given the relative orientation of the two surfaces, the polarizer is acting exactly as it should...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It wasn't really the best scientific test shots that I posted. The one shot was fairly head on, so there wasn't really much reflection on the crystal. I mostly just used it as an example to show that the watch was giving a reflection onto the surface it was sitting on. In the second shot I angled the watch so there was a lot of glare on the crystal and then used the polarizer, which did get rid of the reflection on the plastic surface, but did nothing for the crystal. In the end, now matter what angle I had the watch at with no matter how much glare on the crystal, the polarizer seemed to only affect the surface it was sitting on, but zero effect for reflections off the crystal.

I guess it would have been a better example if I'd used the second pics watch position for both.
 
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