WATCH TALK FORUMS banner

Are COSC movements worth the extra money?

  • Yes

    Votes: 12 40.0%
  • No

    Votes: 18 60.0%
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

Registered
Joined
5,242 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
COSC watches generally have the highest grade ETA movements and are a standard of quality - at least that's the presumption. We certainly can rest assured they've been throughly tested.

But they also carry a hefty premium. Do you think it's worth it?
 

Banned
Joined
2,306 Posts
IMHO,COSC doesn't mean squat to me,I have accurate watches that aren't certified,that have stood up to extreme wear,cold,hot,humid,wet and being jolted from vigorous activity.

I don't think COSC is worth the high premiem, am I correct by saying that the certification is void once the watch is serviced?
 

Banned
Joined
6,021 Posts
I voted no, as I feel if the company guarantees a watch to be accurate within a specified time, and adheres to that via a warranty, why does the consumer need COSC? Well for one, it is protection in a sense by having a 3rd party verify; but, once the watch is serviced, COSC is out the window, aka void, and it is back to the company and their policy standing behind the accuracy behind the watch.
 

Premium Member
Joined
1,603 Posts
It may be nice to have but it wouldn't be a driving factor in deciding if a wanted the watch or not.

Just curious, does anyone know if there are any watches that are offered either with it or without it and what the price difference is? I'm talking about watches that would be virtually the same other than the certificate.
 

Registered
Joined
5,242 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It may be nice to have but it wouldn't be a driving factor in deciding if a wanted the watch or not.

Just curious, does anyone know if there are any watches that are offered either with it or without it and what the price difference is? I'm talking about watches that would be virtually the same other than the certificate.
The COSC movements are adjusted and frequently upgraded - in fact I'd say they're always upgraded. So no apples to apples comparison available, I'd guess.
 

Registered
Joined
741 Posts
The COSC movements are adjusted and frequently upgraded - in fact I'd say they're always upgraded. So no apples to apples comparison available, I'd guess.
This is why I said yes. The movement it's self is a upgrade in parts therefore IMO making the price point more expensive. I however don't think the extremely high prices that I have seen on some brands are warranted. JMHO
 

Premium Member
Joined
2,047 Posts
I interpret the question not as whether the movement is better in watches submitted for certification, but if the certification is worth the premium.

I say no.

If I decide to buy that AirKing, I guess I'll pay for it anyway, as there is no choice that I know of.
 

Registered
Joined
13,431 Posts
I voted no, as I feel if the company guarantees a watch to be accurate within a specified time, and adheres to that via a warranty, why does the consumer need COSC? Well for one, it is protection in a sense by having a 3rd party verify; but, once the watch is serviced, COSC is out the window, aka void, and it is back to the company and their policy standing behind the accuracy behind the watch.
Hey TF,

Someone can correct me if I'm wrong, but for the most part COSC movements are the only ones guaranteed to run inside a set, specific time per day (-4/+6). Non-COSC may carry a 'typical' range of accuracy (say within 10 or 20 sec a day or whatever) but it's not a guarantee and from all the warranties I've read on my non-COSC watches, none of those companies will service it if it's running outside those specs (they'll consider that an adjustment & not a 'defect' thus no warranty coverage) unless somethings actually wrong & needs replaced (aka broken or defect in workmanship). So while they'll stand behind the movement if it breaks, they won't necessarily regulate it under warranty (as regulation isn't considered a defect) should it be outside the norms - unless it's really outside the norms.
 

Registered
Joined
13,431 Posts
I voted yes, but my answer really is maybe. It really depends on the brand.... Some brands are more worth it than others as the COSC versions may also be an overall better watch with better fit & finish than their non-COSC cousin.
 

Registered
Joined
757 Posts
Your right scott, without a COSC cert, there is no way to guarantee accuracy besides the spec'd numbers given from the manufacturer which tends to be wide. Such as the 6r15 which tends to be very accurate having a -15/+25 a day spec. That being said, I voted no, a good thump may set it off. If it is that big of a deal, get it regulated. Of course, it may boost COSC, but you initially put it in so... I'd say its a wash with maybe a slightly smaller loss in resale. .
 

Registered
Joined
865 Posts
I voted yes, but it really depends on the asking price. Chronometers are supposed to be the best quality level of a movement regulated to the tightest tolerances. We pay a premium for things such as better bracelets and straps, sapphire crystals, higher levels of fit/finish, etc so why not superior movement as well?

I cannot think of many watches that offer a choice of movement level "a la carte." Invicta's Reserve line includes a ton of significant upgrades to their Swiss Pro Diver including improved water resistance, thicker sapphire, better bracelet, higher degree of fit/finish, and cosc movement for around $400 more. The movement isn't worth that price increase to me, but coupled with the other upgrades, it is a steal IMO. I'm not even sure you can buy a Rolex dive watch that is not a chronometer, so how can you tell what kind of premium you paid for cosc status?

Cosc may be "window-dressing" for an antiquated technology, but on the other hand the chronometer represents watchmakers never-ending attempts to perfect the mechanical movement. While it never will tell time like a quartz, it offers the pinnacle of achievement for the technology... a technology that goes back centuries, not decades.

Ultimately, it is a personal choice.
 

Registered
Joined
13,431 Posts
I I'm not even sure you can buy a Rolex dive watch that is not a chronometer, so how can you tell what kind of premium you paid for cosc status?
The no-date sub was a non-COSC movement up until this year. It's the exact same movement (well, less a date complication), just not submitted for COSC certification. It sold for $650 less than the COSC sub. The only differences between those 2 watches are the COSC & a date complication. That's about a 14% premium for the date complication & COSC.

I agree with what you said. It's very hard to find the exact same watch with the only difference being the COSC. So it's really hard to say what exactly you're paying for the COSC. Even in the Rolex example, That uplift price is worth it just to get the date IMO.. :wink: :thumbup1:
 

Registered
Joined
5,242 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The no-date sub was a non-COSC movement up until this year. It's the exact same movement (well, less a date complication), just not submitted for COSC certification. It sold for $650 less than the COSC sub. The only differences between those 2 watches are the COSC & a date complication. That's about a 14% premium for the date complication & COSC.

I agree with what you said. It's very hard to find the exact same watch with the only difference being the COSC. So it's really hard to say what exactly you're paying for the COSC. Even in the Rolex example, That uplift price is worth it just to get the date IMO.. :wink: :thumbup1:
I think COSC testing costs $50 a movement. $650 is a hefty premium!
 

Registered
Joined
45 Posts
I voted NO. I will not pay just to get a piece of paper. ANY non-defective ETA movement can be easily regulated to COSC specs. I would much prefer to see a few bucks going to a local watchmaker for regulation of a movement than to pay for COSC testing. However COSC certified watches do have one BIG thing going for them: the movements use much better parts in the critical areas. And you know with the COSC certification that you got the better(actually best) ETA movement.
I was very dismayed not to long ago when I carefully inspected my Jacques Lemans and SWI limited edition 2834/2's all with grade 5(the highest) levels of decorations. I expected them to be "Top" level of the ETA movements. But no they were all the lower lesser "Elabore" grade which uses much lower grade parts. I guess what I am trying to say is getting a better grade of movement is important to me, although so far I've failed, but a COSC certification is not worth the extra dollars...........................................
 

Registered
Joined
741 Posts
I guess again the point is the higher grade movement. Sure any ETA movement can be regulated to COSC standards but knowing that you have a tried and true COSC grade movement may mean alot to some. For me it's really not about the piece of paper but more about what you get under the hood. That being said a 450.00+ upcharge for COSC? makes IMO no sense.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top