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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This had to of been asked before, but I cannot find any information as to why some Constellations are labeled chronometer and some chronometre. Is it the first constellations that are labeled chronometre? I have seen it on a few now
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Am I wrong that Constellations with a bumper movement are Chronometres and those with rotors are Chronometers?
 

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Am I wrong that Constellations with a bumper movement are Chronometres and those with rotors are Chronometers?
That's not a hard & fast rule. I have a 504 full rotor that has -TRE while nearly all the others I've seen are -TER. I don't know for sure if there is a pattern to the spelling. Give it a day or two for some of the other vintage Ω collectors to chime in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Here is the answer

Chronometre versus Chronometer
Omega has confirmed that script from calibre 501 onwards should usually bear the name “Chronometer” on
the dial. However, it says that there are exceptions because it had many dial versions for the same watch
reference. Omega says that while it cannot state with certainty the reason for the change, the increasing
popularity of Constellations in English-speaking countries may have influenced the change. The French for the
English ‘chronometer’ is indeed ‘chronometre’. This change on Omega dials occurred also at a time in the later
1950s when French was losing its status as a major diplomatic language.
In standard non-U.S. English, a distinction is made between something that is used for measurement (in this
case a watch) and what it measures. So, one sees such correct nouns as odometer, thermometer and
chronometer, but metre and calibre remains as it appears in French. I use Chronometre simply for consistency
with the earlier models that appeared as such.
 

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I would respectfully disagree

the TRE spelling was more frequent in the cal. 501/504/505 constellations than the TER spelling. I can comfortably say the TER spelling is the exception rather than the rule for these movements so much so that if you see TER in this group then you should look closely to make sure it is not a redial. All the bumper movements (those that came before) all used TRE and all that came after used TER.
 
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