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Confucius's Asian Watch Fact of the Knight


On Dec. 25, 1969, Seiko introduced its 35 SQ Astron, the world's first quartz watch.

Pic and source: Capetown corp
 

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Ahh...behold the face of the culprit that crumbled the mighty Swiss watch empire. LOL. Just kidding. I think it was good that quartz forced the industry to where it is today.
 

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I love quartz!

Precision is to be admired regardless of how it is achieved.

I'd have a real atomic clock if I could afford one.
 

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I found this article from another forum quite enlightening. Enjoy! :D

(With a tip of the hat to James Dowling, whose "It's OK to Hate Rolex" article served as stylistic inspiration.)

It's OK to hate quartz ...

It's OK to hate quartz if you wish to ignore the fact that the pursuit of improved accuracy has been a (arguably the) central thrust of horological development for centuries.

It's OK to reject quartz, but it's a good bet that horological titans like Harrison, Earnshaw, Leroy, Berthoud, Ditisheim (etc. etc.) would have embraced it. It's an excellent bet that quartz would have been embraced by all who needed accurate time, from early explorers like Captain Cook to the nineteenth century railroads.

It's OK to feel that the one second ticks are low brow, but, at one time, making the second hand move this way was a difficult and sought after complication for mechanical movements.

It's OK to dismiss quartz movements as pedestrian, but, like mechanical movements, they're the incredibly refined end product of more than a century of discovery and development by some of the best scientists and engineers of their time.

It's OK to disdain inexpensive quartz movements, but they're miracles of modern manufacturing, and have made reliable timekeeping affordable to more people than any other horological development.

It's OK to feel that quartz movements have no soul, but, in the heart of every quartz movement beats one of the most perfect mechanical oscillators ever made (the quartz crystal tuning fork). More perfect than any pendulum, balance and hairspring (or, for that matter, any bell or musical instrument) ever made.

It's OK to look down on quartz as declasse, but, without quartz oscillators, there would be no digital electronics, which means no Computer Aided Design/Computer Aided Manufacturing that enabled the modern renaissance of ultra-complex mechanical watches. There would also be no internet talk sites to discuss them.

Is it OK to prefer mechanical watches? Sure -- their movements are mesmerizingly beautiful miniature kinetic sculptures. They evoke a different time in which the craftsman or profoundly skilled manual laborer played a more central and valued role in industry and society. They, or their ship's chronometer cousins, helped literally change the world by enabling exploration then regular commerce among the continents. As one Timezoner succinctly put it, they're a unique nexus of aesthetics, history and technology. Still, if you're tempted to look down on the humble quartz, think about all that it embodies. There's room in the inn for all the little miracles on our wrists.

Pax Aeternam,
Bruce Reding
 

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Interesting thoughts... I had never really considered all that Quartz is, rather I focused on what Quartz isn't.

I should probably apply this to other aspects of my life too. I guess you DO learn something EVERY DAY!
 

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I found this article from another forum quite enlightening. Enjoy! :D

It's OK to hate quartz ...[/I][/B]
Such eloquence.

Such profundity.

I'm in tears here.

 

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