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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
After reading recent posts in this forum, I've fell in love with the Citizen Attesa ATD53-3011 watch.

But now I discovered the equally or slightly more beautiful Citizen Exceed EBS74-5103.

When you look at the pictures, the two watches are very much alike, both titanium and both H610 movements - The main difference being that the Exceed is slightly less chunky and double the price of the Attesa!

Now I would really love to learn from anyone, who has an idea about differences between the two watches - or just a general knowledge of what distinguishes the Exceed series compared to the Attesa series.

CITIZEN ATTESA ATD53-3011:
Watch Analog watch Clock Font Silver

CITIZEN EXCEED EBS74-5103:
Watch Analog watch Clock Font Silver
 

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The movements used in both versions of the Attesa and Exceed are exactly the same. In terms of functionality you don't get added functions with the Exceed version. The caliber used in these watches is the radio controlled H610 "Direct Flight" world timer.

Exceed is more of a luxury-dressy line than the more sporty/avant-garde Attesa range. The Exceed version is more expensive because the dial work is more intricate, the case and bracelet are probably finished more to a Citizen Chronomaster standard. I have not handled the H610 Exceeds but did own the Attesa ATD53-3011 and it was a very nicely crafted and well detailed watch for the money.

Exceed used to be a more affordable showcase of high accuracy quartz thermo compensated watches. In recent years, they have completely switched their watches to radio control. My problem with this approach is not radio controlled technology itself which I find quite intriguing and practical but rather, any quartz watch costing over USD $1,500 should have a form of thermo compensation added to the timekeeping abilities of the movement. Quite frankly, I find these new radio controlled Exceeds to be overpriced and within striking distance of the superior thermo compensated A660 Citizen Chronomaster (My choice anyday of the week when talking about Citizens costing over $1,500),

The Exceed has a smaller 42mm vs the 44mm case in the Attesa version. Unless the smaller size and dressier more refined stance of the Exceed appeals to you, I would be very hard pressed to pay nearly 50% more for the Exceed. Generally, and this is something that bothers me some about Citizens, is that they charge you more for a certain watch even if the same exact movement can be had in versions costing half as much.

Both watches are finished in Titanium with Duratect. Again, no difference there. Also if you want a DLC version of the ATD53-3011, only Attesa offers it (ATD53-3012).

The street price of the H610 Exceed is around USD $1,900. For $200-$300 more you can get a Citizen Chronomaster, which in my humble opinion, is a much superior watch to the Exceed (Any of them) as you'll get something truly special under the hood.... The A660 hand assembled 17 jewels thermo compensated quartz movement good for -/+ 5 seconds per year, perpetual calendar, indepedent set hour hand, 5 year battery and 10 year warranty with a pledge from Citizen that parts and service for your Chronomaster are guaranteed for life.

So in conclusion, if you really want the H610 radio controlled eco-drive movement with world time functionality, the Attesa is the far superior choice for the money. If you are planning to spend close to $2K for a Japan market luxury Citizen, then the Chronomaster A660 is a much better timepiece to bet your money on.

And yes I own a Citizen A660 Chronomaster CTQ57-0961 and I would pick it anyday of the week over the Exceed H610.
 

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Thanks for the detailed comparison, Frank. You're a veritable encyclopedia on things Citizen. :001_smile:

I certainly can't add anything on the Exceed, but will say I'm delighted with my Attesa ATD-3011. I also have to say that Citizen's full front-on photo of it shown at the top of this page is one of the least flattering photos of it that I've seen. In that photo it looks rather dull and clunky. And it totally fails to show the depth of the case design.

In real life, and in other photos I've seen, it's far more attractive. Partly due to the contrast between the highly polished and matte surfaces and the way they set each other off, and partly because of the way the case is sculpted.

While I haven't seen the Exceed in person or in many photos, for me, the price was a deal breaker. I was willing to spend twice the price of a Chrono-Time AT (with the same movement) for the Attesa, but couldn't see nearly doubling it again for the Exceed, especially after seeing the Tanaka photos of the Attessa, and those on the web from other owners.

It was a bit of a leap for me to spend this much on a watch that I'd never had in my hand, but when it arrived, it exceeded my expectations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the detailed replies. - If this is the general quality level of posts here, this forum is truly blessed;)

It seems evident that if not much is written about the Exceed range, it's for a good reason.

The Attesa still seems slightly too large for my taste (even if I totally agree that photos posted in this forum greatly outshines Citizen's full front-on photo).
- I think I'll save for a Citizen Chronomaster - or maybe rather a Grand Seiko Quartz.
 

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Thanks for the detailed replies. - If this is the general quality level of posts here, this forum is truly blessed;)

It seems evident that if not much is written about the Exceed range, it's for a good reason.

The Attesa still seems slightly too large for my taste (even if I totally agree that photos posted in this forum greatly outshines Citizen's full front-on photo).
- I think I'll save for a Citizen Chronomaster - or maybe rather a Grand Seiko Quartz.
I have both, the Chronomaster and the Grand Seiko 9F quartz (SBGT037 to be exact). I love both watches very much. To me the Chronomaster has advantages in the following areas:

- -/+ 5 seconds per year accuracy (Most GS 9F quartz are -/+ 10 secs per year unless is a special LE model which will be fine tuned to -/+ 5 secs per year)
- Perpetual Calendar (Not available on any GS 9F quartz model)
- 5 year battery (vs 3 in the Grand Seiko)
- Independent setting hour hand (Not available in the 9F quartz GS)
- Lumed hands and markers (depending on model)
- 10 year warranty (Vs 2 years for Grand Seiko)
- Guaranteed spare parts and service for the life of the watch (Grand Seiko guarantees parts for the watch for only 10 years after the model has been discontinued)
- Battery replacements, movement regulation/accuracy check, gaskets/pressure test and case-bracelet refinishing (to remove scratches, etc) are all included in the comprehensive and generous "The Citizen" 10 year warranty.
- Warranty for the Chronomaster is Japan only, meaning that twice during the 10 years of the warranty, you have to send the watch back to the original seller which in turn will forward it to Citizen Japan for service. The Grand Seiko warranty is 2 years international
- The Citizen Chronomaster is a little more "uber-exotic" than the Grand Seiko 9F quartz.

Under a 10x loupe I can't find any differences in terms of finishing and detailing between the Chronomaster and GS 9F watches. The GS seems to "glow" more and likely has a tiny bit more exquisite finish. The bracelet quality on both is excellent, but I have to give a nod to the Grand Seiko for the use of screws instead of push pins as is the case of the Chronomaster.

The Grand Seiko has a digital terminal calibration port meaning that the movement can be adjusted in 4 secs per year increments. The A660 in the Chronomaster can only be regulated and adjusted by Citizen Japan (Heiwa watch studio where the watch is assembled by hand).

The Grand Seiko 9F has a vacuum sealed movement and 50 year service intervals!

The seconds hand is driven by a twin pulse motor to minimize alignment problems and backlash. The hands in the 9F Grand Seikos are heavy because the same exact hands are also used in the mechanical and Spring Drive Models. This means that the motors have to draw more power to be able to drive the hands. This is a reason why the 9F movement only has a 3 year battery service life vs 5 year for the Chronomaster.

Another very cool feature of the Grand Seiko is the ultra rapid day/date calendar switch at midnight. Much faster than the human blink of an eye! Grand Seiko really prides themselves on this feature unique to the Grand Seiko quartz watches. Also the day/date change is guaranteed to take place between 12:00-12:05AM.

So as you can see, each watch brings a lot to the table. Pick and chose which features are really important to you and take it from there.

In my experience, you have to own both!
 

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Thanks for the detailed replies. - If this is the general quality level of posts here, this forum is truly blessed;)

It seems evident that if not much is written about the Exceed range, it's for a good reason.

The Attesa still seems slightly too large for my taste (even if I totally agree that photos posted in this forum greatly outshines Citizen's full front-on photo).
- I think I'll save for a Citizen Chronomaster - or maybe rather a Grand Seiko Quartz.
I have both, the Chronomaster (CTQ57-0961) and the Grand Seiko 9F quartz (SBGT037 to be exact). I love both watches very much. To me the Chronomaster has advantages in the following areas:

- -/+ 5 seconds per year accuracy (Most GS 9F quartz are -/+ 10 secs per year unless is a special LE model which will be fine tuned to -/+ 5 secs per year)
- Perpetual Calendar (Not available on any GS 9F quartz model)
- 5 year battery (vs 3 in the Grand Seiko)
- Independent setting hour hand (Not available in the 9F quartz GS)
- Lumed hands and markers (depending on model)
- 10 year warranty (Vs 2 years for Grand Seiko)
- Guaranteed spare parts and service for the life of the watch (Grand Seiko guarantees parts for the watch for only 10 years after the model has been discontinued)
- Battery replacements, movement regulation/accuracy check, gaskets/pressure test and case-bracelet refinishing (to remove scratches, etc) are all included in the comprehensive and generous "The Citizen" 10 year warranty.
- Warranty for the Chronomaster is Japan only, meaning that twice during the 10 years of the warranty, you have to send the watch back to the original seller which in turn will forward it to Citizen Japan for service. The Grand Seiko warranty is 2 years international
- The Citizen Chronomaster is a little more "uber-exotic" than the Grand Seiko 9F quartz.

Under a 10x loupe I can't find any differences in terms of finishing and detailing between the Chronomaster and GS 9F watches. The GS seems to "glow" more and likely has a tiny bit more exquisite finish. The bracelet quality on both is excellent, but I have to give a nod to the Grand Seiko for the use of screws instead of push pins as is the case of the Chronomaster.

The Grand Seiko has a digital terminal calibration port meaning that the movement can be adjusted in 4 secs per year increments. The A660 in the Chronomaster can only be regulated and adjusted by Citizen Japan (Heiwa watch studio where the watch is assembled by hand).

The Grand Seiko 9F has a vacuum sealed movement and 50 year service intervals!

The seconds hand is driven by a twin pulse motor to minimize alignment problems and backlash. The hands in the 9F Grand Seikos are heavy because the same exact hands are also used in the mechanical and Spring Drive Models. This means that the motors have to draw more power to be able to drive the hands. This is a reason why the 9F movement only has a 3 year battery service life vs 5 year for the Chronomaster.

Another very cool feature of the Grand Seiko is the ultra rapid day/date calendar switch at midnight. Much faster than the human blink of an eye! Grand Seiko really prides themselves on this feature unique to the Grand Seiko quartz watches. Also the day/date change is guaranteed to take place between 12:00-12:05AM.

So as you can see, each watch brings a lot to the table. Pick and chose which features are really important to you and take it from there.

In my experience, you have to own both!
 

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Thanks for the detailed replies. - If this is the general quality level of posts here, this forum is truly blessed;)

It seems evident that if not much is written about the Exceed range, it's for a good reason.

The Attesa still seems slightly too large for my taste (even if I totally agree that photos posted in this forum greatly outshines Citizen's full front-on photo).
- I think I'll save for a Citizen Chronomaster - or maybe rather a Grand Seiko Quartz.
1. Yep - a number of incredibly knowledgable regular posters at this forum such as Bullosa and MINDriver are a blessing to all of us who are fans of Japanese horology. :thumbup1:

2. I believe that a Grand Seiko Quartz costs quite a bit more than a Citizen Chronomaster, but even if they were the same price . . . personally I would buy the Citizen.

Good luck!
 

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1. Yep - a number of incredibly knowledgable regular posters at this forum such as Bullosa and MINDriver are a blessing to all of us who are fans of Japanese horology. :thumbup1:

2. I believe that a Grand Seiko Quartz costs quite a bit more than a Citizen Chronomaster, but even if they were the same price . . . personally I would buy the Citizen.

Good luck!
Thank you for your compliments:thumbup1:

It depends. Since Seiko Japan revamped the Grand Seiko 9F quartz line up, the vast majority of their models are now in the same price brackets as the Citizen Chronomasters. Excluding gold, white gold and limited edition Grannd Seiko Quartz models, the most expensive GS quartz are in the 315,000 YEN price range which matches that of the Titanium Chronomasters with 39.5mm cases. The least expensive Chronomasters are the 35mm steel models on straps. The Titanium models retail in the 294,000 YEN range and the steel on bracelet models between 231,000 and 262,500 YEN. My CTQ57-0961 retails at a very reasonable 231,000 YEN sales tax included.

The cheapest Men's Grand Seiko 9F quartz is model SBGX009 and starts at 189,000 YEN. From there, the cheapest steel on bracelet models (There are 4 of them with different dial colors, black, white, cream and blue) have the SBGX063, etc model designation and retail at 210,000 YEN. My SBGT037 (Black dial) and the SBGT035 (Champagne dial) where introduced in Japan July 2010 and are higher quality than the SBGX cheaper bracelet (or international models) and come with the 9F83 caliber day/date movement. Both retail at 241,500 YEN.

Grand Seiko no longer manufactures Titanium quartz models. There used to be a couple of quartz "Master Shop" quartz models in titanium with the 9F83 movement but they retailed at a whooping 420,000 YEN tax included. That money buys you or gets you very close to either a Grand Seiko Spring Drive SBGA001 or SBGA003 both 41mm cases on gorgeous metal bracelets for 472,500 YEN. Because of the global financial situation, Seiko Japan revamped the Grand Seiko quartz lineup, eliminated expensive models and lowered prices across the range. Now it is a good time to consider a Grand Seiko quartz, sans, the dismal USD vs YEN prevailing exchange rate.
 
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