WATCH TALK FORUMS banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
18,138 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Gals and Guys

Do you recall a time, not too long ago when Titanium was all the rage.

There was the Apple Powerbook in Titanium. Indeed I still have one though its' hinges are a little worse for wear and it has long since been mothballed. We had titanium models in the Seamaster range of course. There was a Ti SMP diver and the Ti chronos and the X-33 is in titanium as well. Expensive of course but Titanium offers a superior strength to weight ratio in metals and is inert so anyone allergic to nickel would be able to wear Ti bracelets for instance.

However you see very few examples of it in watches these days. This is probably associated with cost but I recall a dealer once advising me that Ti scratches easily. Armed with this knowledge, I thus make my Ti Seiko my beater of course :001_rolleyes: I can barely see a scratch on it unless I look really hard by which time all that staring has made my eyes sore. A seller of a X-33 recently claimed that Ti was less susceptible to scratches. So I'm a little confused here.

Would you know pals? Is Ti more scratch-resistant than stainless steel?


Y'all be well now


ZIN
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,102 Posts
I'm not an expert, nor do I play one on TV, but I do own a titanium Citizen and my eyeglasses are titanium alloy of the bendable variety.

I wear my Citizen to work often and I have noted no excess scratching, meaning no more so than my SS watches and maybe even less so.

"Physical Characteristics

"A metallic element, titanium is recognized for its high strength-to-weight ratio.[6] It is a light, strong metal with low density that, when pure, is quite ductile (especially in an oxygen-free environment),[18] lustrous, and metallic-white in color. The relatively high melting point (over 1,649 °C or 3,000 °F) makes it useful as a refractory metal.

"Commercial (99.2% pure) grades of titanium have ultimate tensile strength of about 63,000 psi (434 MPa), equal to that of some steel alloys, but are 45% lighter.[5] Titanium is 60% heavier than aluminium, but more than twice as strong[5] as the most commonly used 6061-T6 aluminium alloy. Certain titanium alloys (e.g., Beta C) achieve tensile strengths of over 200,000 psi (1380 MPa).[19] However, titanium loses strength when heated above 430 °C (800 °F).[5]

"It is fairly hard (although not as hard as some grades of heat-treated steel) and is difficult to machine, as it will gall if sharp tools and proper cooling methods are not used. Like those made from steel, titanium structures have a fatigue limit which guarantees longevity in some applications.[20]

"The metal is a dimorphic allotrope with the hexagonal alpha form changing into the body-centered cubic (lattice) beta form at 882 °C (1,619 °F).[5] The heat capacity of the alpha form increases dramatically as it is heated to this transition temperature but then falls and remains fairly constant for the beta form"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titanium#Characteristics
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,123 Posts
Hey Gals and Guys

Do you recall a time, not too long ago when Titanium was all the rage.

There was the Apple Powerbook in Titanium. Indeed I still have one though its' hinges are a little worse for wear and it has long since been mothballed. We had titanium models in the Seamaster range of course. There was a Ti SMP diver and the Ti chronos and the X-33 is in titanium as well. Expensive of course but Titanium offers a superior strength to weight ratio in metals and is inert so anyone allergic to nickel would be able to wear Ti bracelets for instance.

However you see very few examples of it in watches these days. This is probably associated with cost but I recall a dealer once advising me that Ti scratches easily. Armed with this knowledge, I thus make my Ti Seiko my beater of course :001_rolleyes: I can barely see a scratch on it unless I look really hard by which time all that staring has made my eyes sore. A seller of a X-33 recently claimed that Ti was less susceptible to scratches. So I'm a little confused here.

Would you know pals? Is Ti more scratch-resistant than stainless steel?


Y'all be well now


ZIN

Mr. Houston:

Interesting thread.....I do not have personal experience with titanium; but, my understanding is this:

-titanium does scratch more easily than stainless; but, the scratches are easier to get out via buffing or some other process

-titanium is much lighter than stainless steel, so some may prefer this than the weight of stainless

-titanium does not contain any nickel. Those sensitive to nickel may want to consider this

-some state the scratches in titanium are less visible than stainless as titanium is not as polished

-Titanium also has some 'oxidation' properties that actually helps the metal 'heal'. Some experts can hopefully provide some guidance. I will also search the web
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
18,138 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you gentlemen

The " healing " characteristic of Ti is very interesting.

Cost-wise I don't think it offers the watch industry that much since the difference between a stainless steel and titanium model can run into several hundred dollars. A Ti bracelet is easily twice the cost of one in SS. The weight saving though is quite remarkable.


Y'all be well now pals


ZIN
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,084 Posts
:)

SS "heals" too, thats why it doesn't rust (easily).

I have a friend that has a Titanium watch and bracelet, he asked if I could
erase some scratches and I had a harder time, maybe his scratches were just worse than mine..:confused1:

:):)
diver88
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
18,138 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hey Mr Time

That's no end of resources - thanks for researching my friend. :thumbup1:


What's this Terry? Your SS heals as well? Ti is a very hard material so I'm not surprised you had a tough time getting the scratches out but hey, I'm no metallurgist.


Y'all be well now pals


ZIN
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
I've owned several Ti watches and rings and it definately does scratch more easily than SS. The reason why Citizen Ti watches don't show the scratches is cause they put a protective coating on the Ti.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
979 Posts
I've had a couple of Titanium watches and have had them scratch easier than SS. I think the real problem is refinishing is harder. I tried to polish Ti with no success, and I've tried the 3M pad with little success. I had Citizen watches that scratched.

Most Ti watches are bead blasted, so when it scratches, you really see it. I'm no fan any longer of Ti watches. Yes, they are lighter and grayer. Very gray. They look cool on modern stylish watches, but I'll stick to SS.

BTW Zin, what do you think of Apple's new MacBook Air?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
80 Posts
I recieved a Swiss Army (Victorinox) titanium for Chirstmas. I wanted the Titanium because it was different. I love the watch so far.



IMO Titanium may very well scratch easier. The difference is the finish compared to a SS. The scratches may be there but they are much harder to see than on a shiny SS bracelet.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
18,138 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for your thoughts Mr Carmovies

I had forgotten I posted this thread.....

Interesting - would the protective coating not be subject to scratches too I wonder?

I have a Seiko Ti and the scratches on it do not bother me as it's used as a beater but there are scratches alright.

While we're on the subject of scratches, does PVD scratch too and if so would the metal show?


Be well now



ZIN
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top