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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A new Bulova that I actually like! The MIL-SHIPs is certainly a rare watch. I recall one hit ebay a few years ago and sold for tens of thousands. A full article on the history of the release is on Hodinkee and Bulova's Site. The diver helmet is really cool, and the design is spot on. I think the only detractor is that Bulova doesn't make in-house movements anymore. The sellita movement in the limited edition is basically the recreation of ETA designs, so that is a plus if you need to service one.

Maybe I will get one...

226547

226548

226549
 

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Two versions. LE with a Selita, Swiss on the dial, numbered x/1000, with the fantastic aquarium addition of the old school diving helmet watch box. 16mm black woven strap.
And the non LE, Miyota movement, no origin on the dial (supposedly, nobody鈥檚 seen the mock up yet) slightly thinner case, un numbered, blue woven strap, and regular box


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What do Blancpain鈥檚 run? What else? There鈥檚 a Waltham that鈥檚 similar, but rare to find.


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Sorry if I offended you. I'm not hung up on Bulova, re-issues, or dive watches. Check the many quality offerings from Orient.
 

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I borrowed this from another forum where I am a member. I give all credit to The Vintage Bloke
"I like the way it looks, but 895 bucks is more than twice too much for that Miyota. 1990 for an SW-200 version just has to be a joke. The Longines HydroConquest auto with a ceramic bezel, with far superior finishing and specs, retails for $1600, and the L888 in these now features Silicium.

There鈥檚 far better stuff to be found for way less. In a similar aesthetic, and with a Miyota alright - the Baltic Aquascaphe. If you feel like playing the STP1-11 roulette - the Meraud Bonaire.
Oh, and within $2K, you probably can get the Rado Captain Cook, with a Nivachron-equipped Powermatic 80 C07.611 hidden underneath some of the most beautiful dials that I鈥檝e ever seen in Rado, and generally in vintage-style dive watches."
 

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I borrowed this from another forum where I am a member. I give all credit to The Vintage Bloke
"I like the way it looks, but 895 bucks is more than twice too much for that Miyota. 1990 for an SW-200 version just has to be a joke. The Longines HydroConquest auto with a ceramic bezel, with far superior finishing and specs, retails for $1600, and the L888 in these now features Silicium.

There鈥檚 far better stuff to be found for way less. In a similar aesthetic, and with a Miyota alright - the Baltic Aquascaphe. If you feel like playing the STP1-11 roulette - the Meraud Bonaire.
Oh, and within $2K, you probably can get the Rado Captain Cook, with a Nivachron-equipped Powermatic 80 C07.611 hidden underneath some of the most beautiful dials that I鈥檝e ever seen in Rado, and generally in vintage-style dive watches."
Maybe so but i still like the case. 馃槃
 

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At issue is not necessarily wether there is a different finish or different movement to be had for the price. There are, even within the Bulova line. At question is the aesthetic and the history of the piece. If it appeals to you, but you don鈥檛 like the price, my question is find me another watch that meets that spec, that looks similar, at that price. I鈥檓 genuinely curious, as I鈥檓 only aware of Blancpain, Waltham vintage, and the original Tornek.


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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Judging modern watches on a value proposition isnt really something people can agree on. Is a stainless steel rolex any better than a tudor? Maybe nicer finishing and "higher quality" but at 3x or 4x more? If Bulova made an in house movement people would complain its just a "citizen" and id rather have "x". That happened with the electrostatic. Is it really a fair comparison to take a reissue of a vintage watch and compare it to a non reissue modern watch? I enjoy the history and the looks of it. But to each their own. 16mm seems odd, so maybe they went a little far matching the vintage case.
 

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Judging modern watches on a value proposition isnt really something people can agree on. Is a stainless steel rolex any better than a tudor? Maybe nicer finishing and "higher quality" but at 3x or 4x more? If Bulova made an in house movement people would complain its just a "citizen" and id rather have "x". That happened with the electrostatic. Is it really a fair comparison to take a reissue of a vintage watch and compare it to a non reissue modern watch? I enjoy the history and the looks of it. But to each their own. 16mm seems odd, so maybe they went a little far matching the vintage case.
I鈥檒l agree with the 16mm, but it鈥檚 a quirk I appreciate. But but but鈥 if you鈥檙e going to stick with a 16mm Mil Spec watch, why not go with a hand wound movement? That too was the original spec. Make the watch thinner, which is also original spec. It鈥檚 odd for sure.


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Mil Ships review


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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Mil Ships review


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Mil Ships review


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Looks great on the wrist!
 

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THE INSPIRATION of the REISSUE

BULOVA U.S.A.
SUBMERSIBLE
WRIST WATCH

prototype / NEVER commercially launched
watch meant for use by the US Navy for their Underwater Demolition Team [UDT]

1933 act prohibited the U.S. Navy from purchasing Swiss-made watches, so in 1957 BULOVA started working to produce a dive watch which incorporates a NO RADIATION & MOISTURE / WATER INTRUSION indicator to a MILSPEC dive watch BULOVA produced a handful of test watches , but decided not to pursue the USN contract and backed out.


  • This is the same technology that the Blancpain Fifty Fathoms Mil-Spec and Tornek-Rayville TR-900 used.
  • The tech is redundant today but back in the 50s it was a serious piece of dive watch innovation that saved lives.
  • The Radiation Indicator served as a VISUAL indicator if the diver was exposed to harmful radiation
  • A moister level indictor was built in along with the Radiation indicator, again as a visual cue for the diver and integrity of the watch against water intrusion, the indicator would change color alerting the diver that their vital timing instrument had failed, or the diver was exposed to harmful radiation.
Note; It is standard practice that the military destroy prototypes, seems a few managed to escape such a faith

Watch Analog watch Photograph White Light
Watch Analog watch Newspaper Font Clock


Allen Tornek of the Rayville Watch Company and his
Tornek-Rayville 鈥淭R-900鈥

The Watch that started its life from Bulova's Research and Development contract for the US Navy to produce a divers watch for their Underwater Demolition Team (aka: UDT) in 1957

Watch Analog watch Blue Clock Gesture
Watch Analog watch Clock Font Watch accessory


Allen V. Tornek was a New York importer of Blancpain at the time and won the bid and took over the BULOVA contract along with all research material Bulova made, Blancpain now had access to all the material which they refined and incorporated in their 1957 model.

Watch Gauge Clock Font Measuring instrument


Back to the 1933 鈥淏uy-American Act鈥 and Allen V. Tornek, He rebranded the 1957 BLANCPAIN with the ' MOISTURE / WATER INTRUSION indicator ' as the " TORNEK - RAYVILLE US " to get around the 1933 act and sell the rebranded Blancpain pieces to the U.S. government. There were two batches ordered, one in 1964 and another in 1966, for a total of 1,000 units. Due to the radiation markings on the dial, the government reportedly destroyed many, and some say less than 50 survived.

NOTE:
Historically, Tornek-Rayville was not a brand as such, but rather a company launched solely to circumvent the 鈥淏uy American Act鈥, in place in the US in the 1960s that meant American military procurement had to go through American companies.
 
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