WATCH TALK FORUMS banner
21 - 40 of 43 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,439 Posts
And I imagine your power reserve will be just fine if you do the following:
You say you wore the watch one day and it operated for 22 hours after you took it off your wrist Let's say you then returned the watch to your wrist the next day without any additional winding. Based on your activity level the watch should still have approximately 14 hours of operation left in the main spring. So, you wear the watch for another full day. Theorically this adds another 22 hours of run time to the main spring. This should now mean your watch will have 36 hours of run time. Now take if off for another 8 hour night and it now has approximately 28 hours of power in the main spring. Wear the watch all day again and this should add 22 hours of power. But that can't happen because 28 plus 22 is 50 hours of power reserve and your watch is limited to approximately 42 hours. Take the watch off and see how long it continues to run.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Understood, so this means (in theory) that 8 hours a day (or so) loads up a 22-hours cycle.
I thought 8 hours would be enough to "tank up" the power reserve at its full - but perhaps I misunderstood. Once again, I'm a newbie in this world.
I'll do this exercise as per your instructions.
But somehow this kind of watch needs to be worn each day unless we like to set up time often.
I won't go quartz though - my Longines is too beautiful 😊
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,439 Posts
You must have missed the part where the Longines manual says "A mechanical self-winding movement depends entirely on the movements of the wearer’s arm as its energy source. The watch needs to be worn for a certain time so that it remains fully wound. This time varies, depending on how physically active the wearer is. "
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #26 ·
In my case I wore it 11h30 (rather than 8h). During the day, 30 mn biking, some metro commute, and a normal day of office worker.
So in short, you wouldn't worry and it's no use going to service?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Sorry for being a pain - I just wound it up, though it never "blocked" when at its full. I think I did 80-90 rounds and decided to stop. I know I can't overwind it but that doesn't look normal.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,439 Posts
The watch movement does not have a block. It has a clutch. Old hand wind movements will stop when they are fully wound. If you force them they will break. Modern automatic movements disengage the winding stem by way of a clutch when the main spring is fully wound. You can rotate the crown forever but the main spring does not engage.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,439 Posts
Sounds like you need to have a long talk with your vendor concerning your expectation for this watch. I think we've done as much a we can for you on this forum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Sounds like you need to have a long talk with your vendor concerning your expectation for this watch. I think we've done as much a we can for you on this forum.
Let's say I feel I have to double check if there's no defect on my watch. Though these are very rare - I know.
The vendor is a website not located in my country :)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,439 Posts
As "they" say, "buy the vendor, buy the watch." Even on-line vendors usually have help lines. Every watch I currently own with the exception of one came from an on-line source that I have trusted and been able to communicate with for questions or issues. If you can't trust the vendor then that is a whole other issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #36 ·
FYI, the power reserve just lasted exactly 48h51mn after a full manual wind, without being worn (note : according to the official watch description on the website, power reserve is 50h though many sources including official L615 mechanism give "only" 42h... don't know what to believe)
Now I gave the watch another full manual wind and I'll test the automatic wind part by wearing it during day, without manual wind. Will let know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Hi, FYI I wore my watch 3 consecutive days (between 8 and 12 hours a day) in a quite sedentary mode after I wound manually my watch on Monday morning. The watch was still running yesterday evening, now I let it rest and check how long that will last.
It seems the watch does get wound by wearing and not only keeps power reserve as-is (as it's still running Friday morning and wound it Monday morning). Now I'm curious if my 12h wearing yesterday was enough to fully recharge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
I think wrist movement should always be the main thing, some of the eta movements are said to cause extreme wear by constant handwinding, and some watches in general can't be handwound at all.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
16,708 Posts
...and some watches in general can't be handwound at all.
Seiko is notorious for that!. For automatics, it's not a good habit to get in to.
Ever since I retired, I'm often finding my auto watches have have stopped - I'm just not as active as I was when I was employed.
In the evening while the 6:00 news is on, I'll take off my watch and just swirl it in the air 300 -to 350 times to get the movement's pendulum spinning around. It may look odd, but the cat won't laugh, and my watch is good to go the whole next day.
An added bonus is it tones my forearm muscles! LOL
 
21 - 40 of 43 Posts
Top