WATCH TALK FORUMS banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I have acquired an Accutron 2210 watch that I may need to disassemble clean (sonicate) and re-assemble. That of course requires that it be correctly re-lubricated.

The 2210 has a worm gear early on in the drive train, ie one which turns quite quickly as it is "close" to the index wheel.

Web searches didn't help me with any ideas as to what sort of oil, if any, should be used on the worm gear. I'd appreciate any pointer s in the right direction. So far I can't find a service manual for it.

Charles
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
376 Posts
Just oil the pivots, not the worm. Have you serviced a lot of Accutrons? The 221 is probably the hardest. I strongly recommend you don't attempt it if you don't have the service manual, a good microscope, and the various special tools.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Just oil the pivots, not the worm. Have you serviced a lot of Accutrons? The 221 is probably the hardest. I strongly recommend you don't attempt it if you don't have the service manual, a good microscope, and the various special tools.
Indeed, very good advice. So far I haven't found the service manual specific to the 2210. Have the 214 and the 218 and one the has bits about all three.
Thanks for the info on the worm. I was of the view that it shouldn't be oiled, except for the bearings. The rotation speed of the worm is quite slow so I assume it won't need the ultra-low viscosity Moebius oil.

Yes I do have Accutron experience, with 218x movements. Firstly I bought a working one and that was fantastic. Quite surprising accuracy and it was made in 1970!

Next I bought a "for parts not working but hums" 218 movement on an auction site. The idea being to see if I could work on these things. My degree was in biological science (biochemistry) and there was quite a lot of practical work done under stereo binocular microscopes. I enjoyed working under the microscope and was "noticed" as having an aptitude for it.

I have a good binocular 'scope that I use for surface mount electronics, repair and building. It has a large distance objective to the object so is a delight to work under.

I couldn't find a Bulova colet tool anywhere so I made my own using a small bench top modeler's lathe. I had to hand "carve" the tiny "pip" that engages the slot in the colet under the microscope.

I was completely successful stripping down, sonicating, re-lubricating and reassembling the 218 I bought as scrap. Its been humming nicely and keeping great time ever since. Its sitting in a movement holder with a protective ring turned on my lathe and fitted with an acrylic watch glass ever since.

I find they are quite nice to work on but you must respect the delicacy of the pawl and index fingers and have them out of the way before you do anything else. Also touching the index wheel is a no-no. It must be handled only by its spindle. The index wheel must not be oiled, though its bearings should be - if you can guarantee not to oil the wheel too by accident!

I now have a small collection of these lovely humming beasties! The pride of the collection is an Accutron "Deep Sea 666" diver's watch.

I have some non-working 2210 movements on the way to me so I can practice on non-working ones before I go near a working one! I would advise anyone wanting to work on these things to start with a non working movement to gain experience.

Charles
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
376 Posts
Oh also, welcome to the forum! If you have success on 218s I am sure you can service a 221. If you're an AWCI member they have scans of the 221 service manual in their library. Other than that, I don't know of a source except for paper.

The second wheel (the sideways one) comes out FIRST (before taking the train bridge off) and goes in LAST.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Oh also, welcome to the forum! If you have success on 218s I am sure you can service a 221. If you're an AWCI member they have scans of the 221 service manual in their library. Other than that, I don't know of a source except for paper.

The second wheel (the sideways one) comes out FIRST (before taking the train bridge off) and goes in LAST.
No, I'm not a member so still looking for service info on the 2210.
Thanks for the tip about the second wheel. At first glance it looks as though you just take the train bridge off.

I'm in the middle of servicing another 2181 I just got. It was quite cheap and sold as "untested". It was missing the screw that holds the coil side of the cell spring. That got my hopes of good coils up a bit. That's because the cell coil screw has to have an INSULATOR on it, else it promptly shorts the cell out and you appear to have a dead watch, fork doesn't run!

So it proved, the coils are OK. After putting a good cell in and doing the appropriate insulation on the screw the fork promptly started. The index wheel made a half revolution and stopped. Under the microscope the index wheel was seen to be jitering backwards and forwards. So the pawl wasn't holding I guess. Adjustment of the pawl didn't produce any movement. Using higher power showed the index wheel was dirty and so were both rubys. Nothing for it but off with the train bridge and do a complete clean.

After sonication it all looks clean now under the microscop so next re-lubricate and reassemble. Re-fitting the train bridge is the tricky bit... Sometimes they snap mack with a lovely click right away and its all done.

More later when it either works or not!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
OK, the watch is running now. I had some trouble with getting the train bridge on but that was just because I forgot you need to have the setting stem in, ie in the RUN position. If you don't then the brake is on and that holds the centre wheel high and makes settling the bridge difficult.

After that I had to do the "phase" setup. Unusually for a 218 it was somewhat tempremental with difficult to eradicate "double indexing", but eventually I got it running reliably. Next had to clean and lubricate the date mechanism and touch up one of the numerals that had a bit of damage.

When I get my scrap 2210 movement I'll dismantle, clean and try to reassemble it with a view to getting some experience of the 2210. Who knows, I might get a working movement out of it. I'm getting a job lot of three nice and cheap.
C
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I got my scrap Accutron 2210 movements and found some did run, others had o/c coils. I have spares for 2210 cell coils so was able to get three (out of five) working. Most had damage from leaking cells and two still had corroded cells still in them - poor things.

One of the ones I replaced the cell side coil on ran but was full of stuff that had leaked out of the cell. It was all over the fork at the coil end. There wasn't any corrosion near the train bridge so I decided to do a complete strip down to clean it.

Practice on a 2210 was the reason I bought the scrap movements. Thanks again Chris for the tip about the second wheel needing to be removed first, and I assumed fitted after the train bridge is back on. It was a bit fiddly but not really any more so than a 281.

Its all back together now and running very nicely. It sets up very well, much easier than most 218s I've phased. It seemed to be impossible to get it to double index, rock solid and on a modern cell.

I do miss the lovely sweeping second hand, so I'll never be so fond of 2210 movements as I am 218s.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top