WATCH TALK FORUMS banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I will, as the child of an owner whose father was the original owner, eventually own a 1981 model number 16013 rolex oyster perpetual datejust with a jubilee bracelet and champagne dial.
I know basically nothing about fine watches. I wear a Skagen black mesh on black with no date. It is very slim and certainly far from a "luxury" watch, but i like it none the less.
As I will eventually wear the heirloom, I'm doing some preliminary research into what owning it will entail.
I understand that a rolex requires service.
How necessary is this service?
What does it provide?
How expensive is it?
How often should i do it?
I would also like to know if there are any other things you would like to say about owning one, or owning any fine watch.
On a seperate note, the zoom above the date.
Firstly - what is that called.
Second, can it be removed, and if so at what cost?
Lastly - does anyone have any pictures of a model 16013 without a zoom above the date? or know where i could see one?

8650-Rolex-Datejust-16013.jpg
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
28,405 Posts
Welcome!

I understand that a rolex requires service.
How necessary is this service?
VERY necessary, or your future watch will seize up or something will break inside.

What does it provide?
Cleaning and proper lubrication.

How expensive is it?
Right now, a basic service from Rolex runs around $500, then any parts needed beyond the normal maintenance items are additional. An independent watchmaker that has a Rolex parts account can do the same for around half that though.

How often should i do it?
The manufacturers say 4 - 5 years is needed, but with modern lubricants you can stretch it to 7 - 8. The exception is if you dive with your watch, then you should have it's seals tested for correct water resistance every year or two.

I would also like to know if there are any other things you would like to say about owning one, or owning any fine watch.
Yes - enjoy it! It's a watch and was meant to be worn. Don't hide it in a safety deposit box.

On a seperate note, the zoom above the date.
Firstly - what is that called.
Second, can it be removed, and if so at what cost?
It's called a cyclops, but detractors call it a wart. :laugh: It can be removed - search the Rolex Forum for "cyclops removal" and you'll find a few tutorials for the DIY types.

I know that watch :wink::



It's an icon and might be the most copied design in the industry. The only other style that could give it a run for the money in that category would be another Rolex: the Submariner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
805 Posts
jskehan: welcome to the movement. i also have a skagen--a nice design and i like the fact it has no seconds hand. makes for a good dress watch. having a father to son watch is what it is all about. it is a testimony to the watch (able to survive) and to the relationship (dad thinks enough of his son).

i removed the wart from a far less expensive watch and the only caveat i would give is to inquire with rolex about getting a crystal without the wart (ok, the cyclops) as there is always a risk the crystal will crack and rolex may have a crystal without the wart for that watch. i would try the procedure just before you send it in for servicing. if the crystal cracks (should not if the procedure is done correctly but.....) you can save some labor money as the watch will already be opened.


here is a link to the thread I started which includes a video (not mine but the one i used)


http://www.watchtalkforums.info/forums/general-discussion-forum/43551.htm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,448 Posts
If this is a vintage piece with the acrylic crystal, do not attempt to remove the cyclops. You will melt your crystal and have to replace it. If you are going to have it serviced if you go with an independent watchmaker just request it be replaced with a crystal without one if you don't like it.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top