WATCH TALK FORUMS banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Should I get a two-tone or solid stainless bracelet for this vintage Citizen?
41 mm. diameter, 20 mm lug spacing.





I've inherited this watch from my dad. He wore it as you see it on my wrist now, with a black leather strap. A friend gave him the watch; the friend had owned and previously used it himself. 41 mm diameter at the narrowest location, not including crown or buttons.

I suspect the watch originally was on a typical two tone gold + stainless bracelet. My dad always liked leather straps so I think he got this strap for it. Hirsch brand, and stamped "water resistant".

I'm torn as to what strap or bracelet to put this on. I usually avoid two tone watches; I don't like the look. But this was my dad's and I'll probably wear it sometimes. I'm usually more comfortable with a bracelet. I could get a two tone bracelet with curved ends for the 20 mm lugs. Or I could keep the leather strap, which happens to be pretty comfortable. But I think it's the wrong look for this watch.

I finally figured out how to set the LED display. It now matches the hands, and the second hand hits the indexes perfectly. Apparently it has a digital perpetual calendar. I've set the year, and I don't expect to need to change the date for short months. The chrono and alarm functions seem to work but I haven't taken the time to put them fully through their paces.

What do you think?
Silver or two-tone bracelet? Keep it on the leather strap?
Thanks for your thoughts.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,313 Posts
Comfortable or no; if you don't like the look of the strap on a watch, you're not going to be inclined to wear it. You like the idea of a SS bracelet, so go with a bracelet. Consider a monochromatic bracelet. Just because the watch case is two-toned, there's no law that says the bracelet has to be two-toned as well.

And be careful which bracelet you get. The base of the lugs in your interhorn (the space between a watch's lugs is called the interhorn) have pronounced curves to them, so you'll want to have end pieces with rounded tips, rather than pointed tips!


tits.JPG

ends.JPG
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
471 Posts
Comfortable or no; if you don't like the look of the strap on a watch, you're not going to be inclined to wear it. You like the idea of a SS bracelet, so go with a bracelet. Consider a monochromatic bracelet. Just because the watch case is two-toned, there's no law that says the bracelet has to be two-toned as well.

And be careful which bracelet you get. The base of the lugs in your interhorn (the space between a watch's lugs is called the interhorn) have pronounced curves to them, so you'll want to have end pieces with rounded tips, rather than pointed tips!


View attachment 197681

View attachment 197683

My lesson for the day....
Thank You
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
+1
Thank you! I was not aware of the need to match the contour of the inner corners in the interhorn. Which also is a new term for me.

I suspect that for end pieces that aren't plated at the corner tips, I could grind down pointed tips, to become rounded tips. Possibly not as precisely as when done when manufactured, but I bet I could do a good enough job. From your photos, the tips seem to be flat sheet metal, not the folded-over section. It should be possible to "work" those. If I were lucky enough to find solid, rounded end links, those too should be craftable. A Dremel with an abrasive wheel and small files are my friends.

Thank you
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,313 Posts
YOU'RE MOST WELCOME.

First, you're not the only one who hasn't heard that term before. I only discovered it six years ago on the N.A.W.C.C. website.

Second, I too have had to use a rotary tool (mine's a Sears Craftsman) on end pieces.
And I learned real fast to hold them using a pair of pliers! c11.gif
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top