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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got my M50 4days ago and it was running when I took it out of the box. Automatics will wind themselves in the mail, yeah?

So far it has been losing 7 seconds a day and that's consistent over the last 3 days. Is this what others are getting? This is better than the published values of minus10 to 30 sec per day from the Miyota page, but I wonder if there will be a run in period and this will improve. Any one??
 

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I'd be interested to hear what people have to say. The M61 will be my first 9015.
 

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My M51 was running at about -4 per day when I checked it a couple weeks back. LT seems to do a decent job regulating them before shipping.
 

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I got my M50 4days ago and it was running when I took it out of the box. Automatics will wind themselves in the mail, yeah?

So far it has been losing 7 seconds a day and that's consistent over the last 3 days. Is this what others are getting? This is better than the published values of minus10 to 30 sec per day from the Miyota page, but I wonder if there will be a run in period and this will improve. Any one??
I'd monitor your watch for a couple of weeks, making sure you check it against a very accurate reference, and that you use a systematic routine.

So many things affect a watch's timekeeping and "drift." All mechanical watches are VERY "positionally sensitive" and are affected by gravity -- some more/some less -- depending on how they were regulated. My V1's ETA 2824-2 movement loses about 2.5 seconds per day, "on the wrist," and it gains about 3 seconds, overnight, if I place it dial-down on my bedside table.

I can keep the movement "zeroed" just by adjusting the number of hours it rests on the nightstand, face down. :wink:

To further muddy the waters, mechanical movements are also affected by the amount of stored energy in the mainspring ("wind"), so -- if you're in the habit of winding your watch at different times throughout the day -- it adds another complication to determining how close your M50 is tracking its reference clock.

Couple of suggestions: Use a "radio clock," if you have access to one, instead of, for instance, an on-line clock reference (e.g., "USNO Master Clock") because your radio clock will probably be much more accurate and dependable. I use an old "Atomix" that is so ancient, it was made in Republic of China (Taiwan), instead of China. :scared: It has a little button that says "WAVE," and pushing it forces the clock to "re-synch" with the radio signal from Denver. It's VERY accurate. My experience with the clock in my MacBook Pro is that it can be plus/minus a couple of seconds, at any time, and so can my computer's display of the USNO clock because both are affected by network speeds, cable-transmission irregularities, etc. (Comcast internet).

Check your watch at the SAME TIME, every day, and -- even though it's an "automatic" -- I'd make sure you give it a full wind, manually, at the same time every day. Keep a journal for the first month or so. It's fun, and you'll enjoy the routine; it's like "birdwatching," only significantly dumber. When my wife sees me journaling a new watch, she rolls her eyes, and -- if I look like I'm having a particularly good time -- she'll shake her head, too. The unstated message is, "Get a life!" :lol:

In my experience with watches -- and this statement is susceptible to the problems associated with ANY generalization -- most watches SLOW DOWN a little bit during the first couple of months of daily wear. That's because they "break-in" a little bit, and the balance wheel amplitude increases: The number of degrees of rotation increases, so the movement slows as the watch breaks in and finds "its happy place." :biggrin:

All of my Lum-Tecs have slowed a couple seconds (24hr) during the fist month of daily wear. Conversely, one of the symptoms of a watch movement that needs cleaning is a movement that speeds up; the balance wheels loses amplitude, and the movement speeds up.

You get free lifetime adjustments from Lum-Tec, so it's no big deal, regardless of what you discover, but I'm always happy to discover that my new Lum-Tec is, say, 5-8 seconds fast; typically, that means, "when she breaks in," my watch will be +/- a couple of seconds from "zero" in her daily timekeeping. I'm less thrilled with a watch that's 7-8 seconds slow, out of the box, because I suspect that it will be going back for a "tweaking" before too long. I have a well-deserved reputation for anal-retentiveness, but a watch that runs slow makes me a little nutty. I mean even nuttier than usual. :scared:

Make sure you're being an accurate observer, that you use the right tools, that your routine is "systematized," and that you are really measuring what you THINK you're measuring. :thumbup:
 

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These are typical automatic mechanical watch variations.

The fact that a mechanical watch is mechanical why would you ever expect this kind of watch to run like a quartz watch?

All my LUM-TEC mechanical watches run slow, but well within the acceptable range for the movement.

I would think a little investigation in how a mechanical watch actually works would be a good use of your time; then maybe you could better appreciate how these little machines work. :wink:
 

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These are typical automatic mechanical watch variations.

The fact that a mechanical watch is mechanical why would you ever expect this kind of watch to run like a quartz watch?

All my LUM-TEC mechanical watches run slow, but well within the acceptable range for the movement.

I would think a little investigation in how a mechanical watch actually works would be a good use of your time; then maybe you could better appreciate how these little machines work. :wink:
Do NOT attempt to apply logic to this equation, grasshopper.

The reason to attempt quartz-like accuracy with a mechanical movement is "because it can nearly be achieved," kinda like famed (but "disappeared") mountain climber, George Mallory, who replied -- when questioned by a reporter ninety-years-ago, "Why bother with mountain-climbing?" -- "Because it's there!"

Attempting to zero a mechanical watch, is a pursuit for the highly motivated mind -- one not particularly encumbered by the sort of schedules that plague common men of lesser imagination. :lol:
 

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My M50 is losing about 2 or 3 seconds during daily wear.

If I put it on the nightstand face down, it then gains a few seconds again overnight.

If I would do this every day the watch would keep up very nicely.
It is however in rotation and when I'm not wearing it usually sits in my winder where it loses about 4 seconds each day.

All in all I'm very please with the Miyota 9015's performance so far.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
You Take it OFF?? AT NIGHT??

My M50 is losing about 2 or 3 seconds during daily wear.

If I put it on the nightstand face down, it then gains a few seconds again overnight.

If I would do this every day the watch would keep up very nicely.
It is however in rotation and when I'm not wearing it usually sits in my winder where it loses about 4 seconds each day.

All in all I'm very please with the Miyota 9015's performance so far.
If you take it off and put it face down, how can you see the LUME? It's why we buy great LUME, to wear it at night...in bed (getting kinky now) so we can see the great stuff. Seriously good replies from everyone, many thanx...ugly14u
 

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i sent my m51 back to be regulated...it was losing half a minute per day and now its much better since they adjusted it.
 
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